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Voldar: Highly Anticipated Release Of Bob Dylan's Tempest Album To Be Celebrated By Numerous Fan Events Around The World NEW YORK, Aug. 27, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- Leading up to the highly anticipated worldwide release of Bob Dylan's 35th studio album, Tempest, Columbia Records is announcing an international lineup of events that will enable fans to experience the album in advance of its September 11 release date and celebrate with their fellow Bob Dylan enthusiasts around the globe. PR Newswire (http://s.tt/1lNSF) On Monday, August 27, the opening track from Tempest, "Duquesne Whistle" will have its world premiere on NPR Online (NPR.org/music). The song was recently described by the Los Angeles Times as, "the folky sound of old-time country blues guitar licks quietly unfurling before the full band explodes into a driving big-beat rhythm as rollicking as the train ride the song explores." Two days later, at 9 a.m. GMT (4 a.m. EDT), the brand new video for "Duquesne Whistle," featuring Bob Dylan, will have its world premiere on the website of The Guardian (guardiannews.com). The video was directed by Nash Edgerton, who also directed the clip for "Beyond Here Lies Nothing" from Dylan's 2009 release, Together Through Life. On Friday, August 31, fans who visit listentobobdylan.com will find a map of locations in the U.S. and nine other countries where selected songs from Tempest will be streamed to mobile devices. The tracks will be randomly streamed only when users are within the Tempest-tagged geographic areas, utilizing the free web-based Sound Graffiti app (which can be accessed directly through listentobobdylan.com). In addition to the U.S., other countries in which Sound Graffiti locations will be found include Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, France, Germany, Netherlands, Sweden and the United Kingdom. Fans who stream the song will also be given an opportunity to pre-order Tempest from iTunes while they listen. On Monday, September 10, dedicated Bob Dylan Tempest "pop-up" stores will open for a seven day period in New York City, Los Angeles and London. At these stores, fans can purchase the new album, as well as other Bob Dylan releases and exclusive merchandise commemorating these week-long events, including a limited quantity of CDs hand-signed by Bob Dylan. Bob Dylan Tempest stores will be open from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Monday, September 10 so that fans can buy Tempest a full day in advance of its official release, and will remain open from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. through Sunday, September 16. Stores will be located at the following U.S. locations: 819 Washington Street, New York, NY 10014 7763 Melrose Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90046 A Bob Dylan Tempest store will also open in London on Monday, September 10 and remain open through Monday, September 17 at the following location: 47 Beak Street, London, W1F 9SE Additionally, the well-known Dussmann store in Berlin will be dedicated to Tempest and feature special promotions and other activities beginning September 7. Its hours are Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to midnight and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 11:30 p.m.: Dussmann das KulturKaufhaus GmbH, Friedrichstrasse 90, 10117 Berlin While detailed reviews of Tempest will not be published by media outlets until next week, early notices have hailed Bob Dylan's 35th studio album as one of his finest works. Neil McCormick of The Telegraph wrote, "It is fantastic to be able to report that popular music's greatest troubadour is still as brilliant and bewildering as ever. This is an album I can't wait to hear again, the sound of a great artist approaching the twilight of his career with fearless creativity." Author and pop music critic Robert Hilburn wrote, "Dylan set the bar high for himself with the series of rich, engaging albums that began with Time Out of Mind, and he clears the hurdle again gloriously with Tempest. A stunning work." Michael Simmons of Mojo Online wrote, "Tempest is astonishing." Earlier this year, Bob Dylan was the recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the country's highest civilian honor. He was awarded a special Pulitzer Prize in 2008 for "his profound impact on popular music and American culture, marked by lyrical compositions of extraordinary poetic power." He was also the recipient of the French Commandeur des Arts et des Lettres in 1990, Sweden's Polar Music Award in 2000 and numerous other honors. SOURCE Columbia Records PR Newswire (http://s.tt/1lNSF)

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Voldar: Bob Dylan's new interview comments: Critical, provocative, or manipulative? Two provocative excerpts from a Bob Dylan interview with Mikal Gilmore, published in the upcoming issue of Rolling Stone magazine, are spreading like wildfire. And I think that was the intent. (Warning: Adult content) Below is the first excerpt (slightly edited): I want to ask about the controversy over your quotations in your songs from the works of other writers, such as Japanese author Junichi Saga's Confessions of a Yakuza, and the Civil War poetry of Henry Timrod. In folk and jazz, quotation is a rich and enriching tradition, but some critics say that you didn't cite your sources clearly. What's your response to those kinds of charges? Oh, yeah, in folk and jazz, quotation is a rich and enriching tradition. That certainly is true. It's true for everybody, but me. There are different rules for me. And as far as Henry Timrod is concerned, have you even heard of him? Who's been reading him lately? And who's pushed him to the forefront? Who's been making you read him? And ask his descendants what they think of the hoopla. And if you think it's so easy to quote him and it can help your work, do it yourself and see how far you can get. Wussies and p*ssies complain about that stuff. It's an old thing it's part of the tradition. It goes way back. These are the same people that tried to pin the name Judas on me. Judas, the most hated name in human history! If you think you've been called a bad name, try to work your way out from under that. Yeah, and for what? For playing an electric guitar? As if that is in some kind of way equitable to betraying our Lord and delivering him up to be crucified. All those evil m*****f***ers can rot in Hell. Seriously? I'm working within my art form. It's that simple. I work within the rules and limitations of it. There are authoritarian figures that can explain that kind of art form better to you than I can. It's called songwriting. It has to do with melody and rhythm, and then after that, anything goes. You make everything yours. We all do it. Strong words, indeed. Of course we do not know whether Dylan is being serious, cranky, or playful. We do not know the tone, nor are we made aware of Dylan's mood. Sure, the language is strong, but that can be misleading on the printed, or electronic, page. Does he really feel that way, or was it just posturing? After the initial shock, I tried the understand Dylan's comments. Like his songs, his interviews are often a form of theater. Of course, this is all speculation, but I feel that Dylan, once again, is putting us on. First of all, I don't think Dylan really cares about being called "Judas" forty-six years ago. However, that was a cultural milestone, captured on the Live 1966 CD, and manipulated and distorted in Martin Scorsese's documentary, No Direction Home. To many casual fans, that moment defines Dylan in their minds. Dylan knows how to drum up instant press with provocative statements, and now he has come up with this whopper. Sorry, but the idea that Dylan is even the slightest bit concerned with that moment from nearly a half century ago does not ring true. The expletive at the end, so out of character for a wordsmith like Dylan, just emphasizes that this is an attempt to attract attention. However, it was a brilliant public relations move. The report has been repackaged on dozens of sites, thus increasing both the readership of Rolling Stone, and the potential buyers of Dylan's new album. Of course, promoting Tempest is the reason Dylan wanted to be interviewed in the first place, and promote it he does. As for the rest, it was something I had always suspected. Dylan was sprinkling clues in his songs, knowing they would be analyzed. This way, when the sources were eventually discovered, these relatively obscure works would get a surprising amount of new attention. It was a fun, positive thing, a little game he was playing. Dylan freely quotes songs the Beatles recorded in his new composition, "Roll On John," a moving meditation on the death of John Lennon. The sources were obvious, so Dylan was not brought to the court of public opinion. However, when it comes to old blues, country, or folk tunes, or works of literature, everyone has a field day, trying to accuse Dylan of ripping off, rather than paying tribute to, the often long forgotten original artists. The original detective that uncovered many of Dylan's sources, Scott Warmuth, never complained, or judged the artist. He just pointed out where Dylan was getting his material. Other people, however - those who often referred to Warmuth's work without attribution, ironically - did complain. The comments were typically lazy accusations by people with too much time on their hands, and not much upstairs. No wonder Dylan said what he did! When I asked Warmuth if he would like to contribute to this article, he sent this Jack London quote: "I can conceive of no more laughable spectacle than that of a human standing up on his hind legs and yowling plagiarism. No man with a puny imagination can continue plagiarizing and make a success of it. No man with a vivid imagination, on the other hand, needs to plagiarize." The Rolling Stone interview also includes Dylan's thoughts of slavery, and its affect on the United States. From an Associated Press posting: Bob Dylan says the stigma of slavery ruined America and he doubts the country can get rid of the shame because it was "founded on the backs of slaves." The veteran musician tells Rolling Stone that in America "people (are) at each other's throats just because they are of a different color," adding that "it will hold any nation back." He also says blacks know that some whites "didn't want to give up slavery." The 71-year-old Dylan said, "If slavery had been given up in a more peaceful way, America would be far ahead today." When asked if President Barack Obama was helping to shift a change, Dylan says: "I don't have any opinion on that. You have to change your heart if you want to change." The version available on the Huffington Post's site has had 1,279 comments posted in just over nine hours. If that is not evidence of Dylan's ability to create a buzz, I don't know what is. All in all, it was a great job by Dylan. He was getting people to think, and start a dialogue, something he's been doing for half a century. The great provacateur, Dylan continues to make news, and make us look at ourselves, no matter how uncomfortable that may be. http://www.examiner.com/article/bob-dylan-s-new-interview-comments-critical-provocative-or-manipulative

Voldar: Bob Dylan sees 'red' as he begins autumn tour with Mark Knopfler Bob Dylan kicked off the autumn tour with Mark Knopfler at the MTS Centre in Winnipeg, Manitoba, last night. He performed only one song from his new album, Tempest. It may have been a coincidence, but the show took place on the 25th anniversary of a pivotal Dylan concert, at least according his book Chronicles, Volume One. On October 5, 1987, Dylan played Piazza Grande in Locarno, Switzerland, and, in his "memoir," wrote how he got his groove back at that show. I also learned from Theme Time Radio Hour that more people were born on October 5 than any other day, coming nine full months after New Year's Eve. Set lists for MTS Centre, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada: October 5, 2012 Bob Dylan, courtesy Bob Links: 1. Watching The River Flow 2. It Ain't Me, Babe 3. Things Have Changed 4. Tangled Up In Blue 5. Tweedle Dee & Tweedle Dum 6. This Dream Of You 7. Summer Days 8. Desolation Row 9. Highway 61 Revisited 10. Scarlet Town 11. Thunder On The Mountain 12. Ballad Of A Thin Man 13. Like A Rolling Stone 14. All Along The Watchtower // 15. Blowin' In The Wind For more details on Dylan's set, please visit Bob Links. Mark Knopfler, courtesy A Mark In Time: 1. What It Is 2. Corned Beef City 3. Yon Two Crows 4. Privateering 5. Redbud Tree 6. I Used to Could 7. Song for Sonny Liston 8. Daddys Gone to Knoxville 9. Hill Farmer's Blues 10. Haul Away 11. Miss You Blues 12. Marbletown // 13. So Far Away Band member Guy Fletcher is blogging about the tour. A few observations about Dylan's set: The show began with "Watching The River Flow." This is not unusual, as Dylan played it in the opening slot a handful of times near the end of the last tour. However, the original recording sessions featured Kathi McDonald on backing vocals (although not on that track). McDonald died earlier in the week at the age of 64. Fans were eagerly anticipating the live debuts of songs from Dylan's new album, Tempest. Dylan, however, only performed one, "Scarlet Town," on opening night. ("Scarlet." "Red." Get it?) Expect more songs to be added as the tour warms up. He also dug out "This Dream Of You," from Together Through Life. According to His Bobness, this is only the twelfth performance of the song, although half of these were from this calendar year. Dylan's set was somewhat shorter than usual, in order to give more time to the support act. Knopfler hinted in a recent interview that there would be some collaborations on stage, but apparently that did not occur last night. The next show is tonight at the Brandt Centre, in Regina, Saskatchewan. http://www.examiner.com/article/bob-dylan-sees-red-as-his-begins-autumn-tour-with-mark-knopfler

Voldar: . Ex-guitarist guests with Dylan in Santa Barbara; 'Bootleg Series' going country? While Mark Knopfler has yet to appear with Bob Dylan on their joint autumn tour, former Dylan guitarist Freddy Koella made a surprise appearance at California's Santa Barbara Bowl last night. According to Dylan's official site, Koella snuck on stage during his former boss's set and played guitar on two songs, "Things Have Changed" and "Tangled Up In Blue." Koella was a member of Dylan's band in 2003 and 2004. Below are last night's set lists, courtesy A Mark In Time and Dylan's official site: Santa Barbara County Bowl, Santa Barbara, California: October 22, 2012 Mark Knopfler: What It Is Corned Beef City Privateering Yon Two Crows I Used to Could Song for Sonny Liston Haul Away Hill Farmer Blues Marbletown So Far Again Bob Dylan: Watching The River Flow Man In The Long Black Coat Things Have Changed (Freddy Koella on guitar) Tangled Up In Blue (Freddy Koella on guitar) Cry A While A Hard Rain's A-Gonna Fall High Water (For Charley Patton) Chimes Of Freedom Highway 61 Revisited Mississippi Thunder On The Mountain Ballad Of A Thin Man Like A Rolling Stone All Along The Watchtower // Blowin' In The Wind Last night was the 13th show of this leg. There were no tour debuts. Returning to the set list were the second "Man In The Long Black Coat," the third "Chimes Of Freedom" and "A Hard Rain's A-Gonna Fall," the fourth "Mississippi," the fifth "High Water (For Charley Patton)," and the sixth "Cry A While," of the tour. In addition, "Watching The River Flow" returned to the opening slot after one night off. According to a comment on yesterday's article by Frank Cipriano, the lyrics for yesterday's opener, "You Ain't Goin' Nowhere," were more like the 1971 version released on "Greatest Hits, Vol. II" than from the original "Basement Tapes." Keyboardist Benmont Tench III tweeted about attending last night's show. When I asked him how it was, he replied, "Bob-esque. No Tempest, though, which was a shame." http://www.examiner.com/article/ex-guitarist-guests-with-dylan-santa-barbara-bootleg-series-going-country

Voldar: . Bob Dylan's Chicago blues instrumental mystery may have been solved Friday evening, when Bob Dylan played guitar on an instrumental to kick off his headlining set at Chicago's United Center, there was no consensus from fans what the song was called. Some thought it was "Rainy Day Women" (which is currently listed on Dylan's official site), others believed it was a common opener, "Watching The River Flow." There was even speculation it was "Leopard-Skin Pill-Box Hat," or possibly the blues classic, "Dust My Broom." Bill Pagel, of Bob Links fame, changed his original set list post opening number from "Watching The River Flow" to something more appropriate for the occasion - "Sweet Home Chicago": I've listened to the first song a number of times and compared it to Stevie Ray Vaughan doing an instrumental "Sweet Home Chicago" and I am convinced that the first song was "Sweet Home Chicago." The obvious reason for Dylan to play "Sweet Home Chicago" would be to acknowledge the blues-based city in which he was playing. However, another could be President Barack Obama, the candidate Dylan predicted would win last week's election in a landslide, sang part of the song, at the urging of Mick Jagger and B.B. King, in the East Room of the White House, February 21, 2012, for In Performance at the White House: Red, White and Blues. President Obama, of course, was a United States Senator from Illinois before he began his current occupation. Or maybe the song was just, as critic Greg Kot noted, a "Blues instrumental." Updated set list, courtesy Bob Links: United Center, Chicago, Illinois: November 9, 2012 1. Sweet Home Chicago (Instrumental - Bob on guitar) 2. To Ramona (Knopfler on guitar) 3. Things Have Changed (Knopfler on guitar) 4. Tangled Up In Blue (Knopfler on guitar) 5. Blind Willie McTell (Knopfler on guitar) 6. Make You Feel My Love 7. The Levee's Gonna Break 8. Desolation Row 9. Highway 61 Revisited 10. Forgetful Heart 11. Thunder On The Mountain 12. Ballad Of A Thin Man 13. Like A Rolling Stone 14. All Along The Watchtower // 15. Blowin' In The Wind Note song number five now also credits Mark Knopfler on guitar. http://www.examiner.com/article/bob-dylan-s-chicago-blues-instrumental-mystery-may-have-been-solved

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Voldar: . At tour ending show, Bob Dylan gives Brooklyn fans extra song Bob Dylan and Mark Knopfler finished their 33 concert tour of North American earlier tonight at Brooklyn's Barclays Center. While there were no surprises, for the first time this autumn Dylan played a 16 song set, instead of the usual 15. Below is tonight's set list, courtesy Bob Links and Facebook: 1. You Ain't Goin' Nowhere 2. Don't Think Twice, It's All Right (Knopfler on guitar) 3. Things Have Changed (Knopfler on guitar) 4. Tangled Up In Blue (Knopfler on guitar) 5. Early Roman Kings 6. Chimes Of Freedom 7. The Levee's Gonna Break 8. Visions Of Johanna 9. Highway 61 Revisited 10. Soon After Midnight 11. Thunder On The Mountain 12. Forgetful Heart 13. Ballad Of A Thin Man 14. Like A Rolling Stone 15. All Along The Watchtower // 16. Blowin' In The Wind For the second night in a row, Dylan played "Soon After Midnight." Sadly, there was no Dylan/Knopfler duet to end the tour, as was the case last year in London, exactly one year ago tonight. Comedian and Current TV/VH1 presenter John Fugelsang shared his thoughts with me on last night's show in Washington, D.C.: Observations on D.C. in no particular order: Having Knopfler onstage seems to really invigorate Bob - Wish Mark had stayed for the whole show; the room really liked his set. I had a great seat in D.C. & really got to watch Bob's hands at the grand piano. It was the best possible way to watch him; his playing is great fun & often quite lovely. Having him seated for most of the show takes away a fair bit of energy at times. When Bob stood up at the keys during "Thunder," the crowd loved it. Great to hear "Soon After Midnight" in its live debut. I once got to hear the live premiere of "Things Have Changed" and it really is exciting to witness something like this. When Charlie Sexton re-joined the band in '09 it was great fun to see all the flair he brought to every concert. Tonight was more subdued and I missed watching him show off. The songs where Bob sings downstage at the mic continue to be pretty dazzling. This was by far the best "Ballad of a Thin Man" I've seen. I loved when he began performing it this way in '09 but it's evolved into something demonically beautiful. There was once a period where I thought Bob should give "Watchtower" a break; I'll won't say that again. Bob's interplay with his band from behind the grand piano made this the best live "Watchtower" I've seen. Every show without that drawn-out 'poet laureate' introduction is a gift for the ears. Stu's solo acoustic guitar opening was elegant & gorgeously evocative of "Blood on the Tracks." Watching Bob enter the stage without the hat on his head gave a brief sense of hope he might have forgotten it. The usual walkouts; those expecting the live greatest-hits jukebox weren't destined to enjoy this. Bob's enunciation was quite good for most of the show. Bob was having a blast onstage during "Things Have Changed" and adding some hilarious asides. After singing "The next 60 seconds could be like an eternity" he threw in "that's a long time!" Listen to it when you can. I'm not much of a critic, Harold, but bootlegs don't do these appearances justice. He keeps having the kind of moments that make one really glad to follow what he does. Can't wait for Brooklyn tonight.... Thanks, John! Fuglesang can be followed on Twitter (@JohnFugelsang), as well as on his "Caffinated" series on You Tube. He just finished seeing Dylan again tonight in Brooklyn. During the show, he tweeted, "Bob's not wearing a hat." North American Fall Tour with Mark Knopfler and his band: 5 October 2012, Winnipeg, Manitoba - MTS Centre. Capacity 16,345. 6 October 2012, Regina, Saskatchewan - Brandt Centre. Capacity 6136. 8 October 2012, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan - Credit Union Centre. Capacity 7800. 9 October 2012, Edmonton, Alberta - Rexall Place. Capacity 16,839. 10 October 2012, Scotiabank Saddledome, Calgary, Alberta. Capacity17,000. 12 October 2012, Rogers Arena, Vancouver, British Columbia, Capacity 18,650. 13 October 2012, Key Arena, Seattle, Washington. Capacity 16,641. 15 October 2012, Rose Garden Arena, Portland, Oregon. Capacity 19,800. 17 October 2012, Bill Graham Civic Auditorium, San Francisco, California. Capacity 7,000. 18 October 2012, Bill Graham Civic Auditorium, San Francisco, California. Capacity 7,000. 19 October 2012, Greek Theatre, Berkeley, California. Capacity 8,500. 20 October 2012, Power Balance Pavilion, Sacramento, California. Capacity 17,317. 22 October 2012, Santa Barbara County Bowl, Santa Barbara, California. Capacity 4,562. 24 October 2012, Valley View Casino Center, San Diego, California. Capacity 16,100. 26 October 2012, Hollywood Bowl, Los Angeles, California, Capacity 17,376. 27 October 2012, Mandalay Bay Events Center, Las Vegas, Nevada. Capacity 12,000. 29 October 2012, 1st Bank Center, Broomfield, Colorado. Capacity 6,500. 30 October 2012, 1st Bank Center, Broomfield, Colorado. Capacity 6,500. 1 November 2012, Verizon Theatre, Grand Prairie, Texas. Capacity 6,824. 2 November 2012, BOK Center, Tulsa, Oklahoma. Capacity 13,644. 3 November 2012, CenturyLink Center, Omaha, Nebraska. Capacity 18,300. 5 November 2012, Alliant Energy Center, Madison, Wisconsin. Capacity 10,200. 7 November 2012, Xcel Energy Center, St. Paul, Minnesota. Capacity 18,064. 8 November 2012, BMO Harris Bradley Center, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Capacity 20,000. 9 November 2012, United Center, Chicago, Illinois. Capacity 23,500. 12 November 2012, Van Andel Arena, Grand Rapids, Michigan. Capacity 10,834. 13 November 2012, Fox Theatre, Detroit, Michigan. Capacity 5,000. 14 November 2012, Air Canada Centre, Toronto, Ontario. Capacity 15,800. 16 November 2012, Bell Centre, Montreal, Quebec. Capacity 15,000. 18 November 2012, TD Banknorth Garden, Boston, Massachusetts. Capacity 19,600. 19 November 2012, Wells Fargo Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Capacity 21,660. 20 November 2012, DC - Verizon Center, Washington. Capacity 20,282. 21 November 2012, Barclay's Center, Brooklyn, New York. Capacity 19,000. http://www.examiner.com/article/at-tour-ending-show-bob-dylan-gives-brooklyn-fans-extra-song

Voldar: , , , . 'Time Out Of Mind' guitarist Duke Robillard to join Bob Dylan's touring band It appears blues guitarist Duke Robillard will be joining Bob Dylan's touring band next year. The following was posted yesterday to the Byron Bay Bluesfest forum (with typos fixed): Duke Robillard was to be toured by an Australian Blues promoter who had sold a date on the tour to Bluesfest. It has transpired that he was unable to get the number of shows needed to proceed with the tour, and then advised us, and Duke's agent, he was canceling. Bluesfest then attempted to resurrect the tour, but found it impossible when Duke Robillard subsequently advised he needed to cut the tour short due to his being appointed by Bob Dylan as his new guitar player - and needing to get back to the US by April 1 for rehearsals, and only being available for a much shorter run of dates, which did not make coming to Australia at this time viable... Sincerely, Peter Noble Bluesfest Director Robillard, a co-founding member of Roomful Of Blues, was brought in by Dylan to play on his 1997 album "Time Out Of Mind." According to Olof, Robillard appeared on the following songs from those sessions: "Million Miles," "Tryin' To Get To Heaven," "Can't Wait," "Mississippi," "Red River Shore," and "Marchin To The City." Here is a quote from engineer Mark Howard about the sessions, courtesy Uncut magazine: (Co-producer Daniel Lanois) had put together a band, and then Dylan had put out the call for these guys like Jim Dickinson, Augie Meyers, Duke Robillard, Cindy Cashdollar. Dylan brought in all these Nashvile people, and I think that made Dan a little mental having all these Nashville strummers strumming, it was a bit too much. As Im sure Jim Dickinson has said, there were a lot of ingredients in there that you dont actually hear on the record, because things were filtered down so we could take a cleaner path on some of them. As of now, dates posted on the Duke Robillard Band's tour page still list shows past April 1. This development has not been confirmed by Dylan's management. It is unclear who, if anyone, Robillard will be replacing in Dylan's touring band. Of course Robillard's career expands much wider than his time short time with Dylan. After his stint with Roomful Of Blues, he played with the Fabulous Thunderbirds for a few years before forming his own band. He has played with everyone from Pinetop Perkins and Jimmy Witherspoon to Jay Geils and Tom Waits. He has been nominated for many awards, including Grammys for Best Contemporary Blues Album (2007) and Best Traditional Blues Album (2010). http://www.examiner.com/article/time-out-of-mind-guitarist-duke-robillard-to-join-bob-dylan-s-touring-band

Voldar: , , . For I is Someone Else: A Review of Who Is That Man? In Search of the Real Bob Dylan For I is someone else, wrote Arthur Rimbaud in one of his famous seer letters of May 1871. If the brass awakes as a horn, it cant be to blame. France was just out of its war with Prussia, and Paris was controlled, for the rest of the month at least, by the Marxist Commune. Living in his childhood town, Rimbaud seems to have gone mad from boredom as uncertainty swirled in the capital. This was a year into the precious five in which he would write all the poetry he would ever write, and the surrealist savant was already furiously marching into the unknown by a derangement of all the senses. On his path to becoming a secular seer, Rimbaud claims to have known himself well enough to see his own thoughts with a degree of removal. Im around for the hatching of my thought: I watch it, I listen to it. You cant help who you are, he contended, but you should at least realize how vapid that self of yours really is. It is wrong to say I think: one should say I am thought. When I read those words, the bells went off, wrote Bob Dylan of Rimbauds letter in his autobiography, Chronicles. It made perfect sense. In March of 1965, thirty-five hundred Marines landed in South Vietnam. Two weeks later, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. marched from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama with thirty-two hundred protestors as the Civil Rights movement gained real traction. Later that month, Dylan released Bringing It All Back Home, kicking off his neon Rimbaud phase as David Dalton terms it in his new book, Who Is That Man? In Search of the Real Bob Dylan (Hyperion, 2012) Dylan was also deranging his senseswith speed, marijuana and fameand writing lyrics that were almost a direct transcription of how his mind works. He was seeking refuge from the smoke rings of [his] mind, the twisted reach of crazy sorrow, as Mr. Tambourine Man puts it. The listener of Bringing It All Back needs only to sit with Dylan on that windy beach to watch as the images and ideas tumble out of the waves of his subconscious. Dalton is kind enough, though, to sit between you and the National Living Treasure to translate, substantiate and contextualize what we see in front of us. The veteran rock critic explains to us on the second page that Dylan is a method actor who sees his life as an emblematic movie. This film begins with Robert Zimmerman leaving the University of Minnesota after a year of school for New York in 1959, where he named himself after a poet and then proceeded to lackadaisically fill in the new identity with dozens of pasts, and soon Bob Dylan had made a name for himself in the thriving folk-revival scene in Greenwich Village. By 1961, he gained the notice of the New York Times, which declared that it matters less where he has been than where he is going. That the ubiquitous nomadic legend/cultural institution was, at this writing, preparing to play a show in Buenos Aires, having played Porto Alegre, Brazil yesterday, testifies to the Delphic nature of that insight. And as if to hammer the point home, Dont Think Twice, Its All Right, came on in the bagel shop as I wrote this paragraph. Of course weve all heard Dylans music in public, and perhaps millions of us have been to his concerts. We know the public image of an image-obsessed man, as Dalton makes clear from the beginning. Take Dylans stance on the famous 1965 Newport Folk Festival incident, when Dylan was supposedly booed for performing on an electric guitar for the first time. In 2005, he said definitively that they werent booing at him, but the following year, Youre nobody if you dont get booed sometimes, reverting back to the public narrative he allowed to develop about it in the 60s. At this point, its advantageous to have the likes of Dalton as a guide: Nevertheless, the booing of Bob at Newport (now enshrined in pop-music history) is a myth. There may have been murmurs from a few die-hard folkie purists, but most of the objections I heard that day were about the lousy sound system. Dalton expertly holds on to the first person for these sorts of I was there moments, which both dispel myth and grant the reader a direct line to Dylan. His style peels back the cloudy laminate of popular history, which at times shows us just how much we conflate and exaggerate the past to fit our preferred image. Because, with Dalton, we see that he lives in each of our heads, behind cagey, allegorical lyrics that in prodding our subconscious minds gives us insight into why we must ask questions like Who Is That Man? To pursue the real Dylan is to realize the reconstructive nature of personal memory and the mythologizing tendency of collective memory, and Daltons perspective offers us a portrait of Dylan that is by no means transparent, though much clearer than any collective cultural memory could be. In 1965, much the same as Rimbaud in 1871, Dylan was coming loose, acquiring new friends, morphing into the Dylan he would spend the rest of his life trying to escape. Both were intoxicated on what was going on around them, but their artistic output was not in any way about those times so much as it was of them. The song is infrequently the work of a singer, which is to say rarely is its thought both sung and understood by its singer, wrote Rimbaud. The sheer haphazardness with which Dylan created both his music and the various personas that inhabited them seems to indicate that this held true for Dylan as well. This wasnt an act; this was simply Bob, as Dalton says. Its interesting, for a Dylan neophyte like myself, to see how the seasoned music journalists experiencing of a song from that time, such as the frenetic Subterranean Homesick Blues, runs up against my own. The song has the breathless quality of hip-hop, as Dalton points out. It hits you over the head with its pace, leaving the listener to wander in a state of confused rapture. The meaning always forms in your head a half beat behind the words, if you can understand what hes saying. Regardless, the hallucinatory style imparts at least some of the speed-blitzed highly-associative paranoia of a man thats been standing on the pavement thinking about the government. But I also cant help but expect a bass drop after that line, the same place where Dalton hears Chuck Berry. In 2009, Juelz Santanas Mixing up the Medicine, was a minor internet hip-hop hit, rising quickly but then deflating meagerly into the corner where it lives on YouTube, having plateaued at the decidedly mortal view count of 1.9 million. It, like the famous opening scene of Dont Look Back, features Santana holding up posters with the lyrics hand-written on them. In the rap video, this interesting homage only lasts for the length of the initial hook. The song then sadly falls into boring verses about how good of a rapper Juelz Santana is, how good he is with women, how good he is at making hits, and so on. Like cheap bread, the song is sweet and easily consumed when fresh, but goes stale in a week. Its somewhat appropriate though that Dylan, the magpie of folk music, has had his Beatnik blues so callously sampled. He commandeered the folk music of Appalachia and electrified it to express a mid-sixties existential disillusionment (Twenty years of schoolin and they put you on the dayshift); Juelz Santana, with his short-looped hook and choppy verses, reflects the instant fame, hype driven hit cycle of the internet. Ever since the Byrds did their Sweet-N-Low version of Times They Are A Changin, more pop oriented acts have been making Dylan more digestible for the mass market, for no easily discernible artistic reason. Mixin Up the Medicine takes up that paper crown, and in doing so, confirms that our culture is still interested in putting on Dylans masks, on playing his songs and, without even realizing it, being played by his mind. Pop culture is the brass that has awoken a horn, and it the likes of Dylan which plays it. Who Is That Man? documents its way to the same point Rimbaud makes in his ecstatic letter. The book makes no strong argument or over-arching interpretation of Dylans life or music, and instead accepts and surrenders itself to the chaos of Dylans mind. http://www.gadflyonline.com/home/index.php/for-i-is-someone-else-a-review-of-who-is-that-man-in-search-of-the-real-bob-dylan-by-matt-conover/

Voldar: , . I'm in BobDylanLand in my studio, every darn pressing ever, getting ready for Greatest Hits, Vol 2.. Getting ready for mastering Dylan's Greatest Hits, Vol. 2 from scratch for Audio Fidelity and I'm surrounded by every variation of the two LP set plus every album that the songs were originally taken from. It's monumentally confusing but I'm trying to get each and every song from a pure ORIGINAL mix and hopefully I can do it. If not, such is life, some of the tapes are pretty shot but surprisingly, most aren't. Basically I'm revisiting the Dylan catalog. I have each and every in print disk plus all the original vinyls I can lay my hands on. :^) to try and figure out what they did originally on the two LP set and what they did for the CD version. I have all the old 45's as well. Can you say "Watching The River Flow", dude? At any rate, that's my end of the week so far. Stephen Marsh had a bunch at his studio (each and every Dylan SACD both MoFi and Columbia) and he just ended up shipping them to me so he could have a life. However, this is mine for the moment, good thing I like Bobby Dylan. The vinyl is trippy to listen to for some of these original albums. There is so much bass cut on some of them that I hear nothing below 100 cycles sometimes. Then other cuttings have more bass but less good midrange magic. It's interesting how the cuttings vary in terms of sonics. My goal (as ever) is to make Dylan sound as much like a human man as possible and let the instruments fall where they may. One thing we must not do however is vary the CONTENT one little bit. There are some nice count-offs and doodad's at the end of the reels but we can't use them, sorry. Only content that was on the original two record album set. Looking forward to the actual mastering which will take a lot longer than usual due to the nature of the music, the condition of the music and the length of this release. Fun time! Stay tuned! http://forums.stevehoffman.tv/threads/im-in-bobdylanland-in-my-studio-every-darn-pressing-ever-getting-ready-for-greatest-hits-vol-2.309794/