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Voldar: Review: Bob Dylan at the Mann Bob Dylan is so old and weird and vocally ravaged that theres been muttering on the Internet and in more respectable quarters that the septuagenarian Bard should bring the Never-Ending Tour to an end, and hang up his dancing shoes for good. Balderdash. On Wednesday night, Dylan played the Mann Center for the Performing Arts in Fairmount Park. Sure, he often sounded like a dying bullfrog scat-singing difficult-to-decipher Bob Dylan songs. (Was that Leopard-Skin Pillbox-Hat, he opened with in a predictably unfamiliar arrangement? Indeed it was.) And yes, when he stood stage center without an instrument and sang with arms extended while wearing a broad-brimmed white hat and black cowboy outfit, he did look like a macabre cross between Maurice Chevalier and Vincent Price. But when he was singing in a scorched-earth voice and sometimes, playing a keyboard you could actually hear, or blowing into a harmonica on Tangled Up In Blue, or playing a tasty, surprisingly well-thought-out guitar solo on Simple Twist Of Fate he was singing incomparably great Bob Dylan songs. More importantly, he sang the lyrics of a revamped Desolation Row, faithful to-the-Chicago blues original Beyond Here Lies Nothing, and swaggering, rugged, despairing Blind Willie McTell like they were of importance to him. Maybe of not as much importance as they were to the devoted Dylanologists among the crowd of 6000 or so, who were warmed up with a mildly ingratiating blues boogie-woogie opening set by Leon Russell, the 69 year old pianist who was a vision of blinding whiteness in matching cowboy hat, shirt and a Cousin It-style beard and hairdo that didnt appear to have been trimmed since A Song For You was recorded in 1970. But if Dylan himself didnt sing as if ascribing as much meaning to every word as his reverent multi-generational followers do, his performance did disprove a key line in one of his best latter-day songs. I used to care, but things have changed, a disingenuous claim that adds up to one big lie, to crib another line from Things Have Changed. Dylan has been acting blasé and pretending not to care since I dont know, 1966 or so? But you dont keep on keepin on as productively as he has in his senescence without investing a great deal of yourself into your work. Even in the case of songs that wearily claim, as Dylan did during Mississippi on Wednesday, that claim he has Got nothing for you, had nothing before / Dont even have anything for myself anymore. Skeptical fans who have grown weary of Never-Ending tour dates and chose to sit this one out picked the wrong time to bail on Bob, who was engaged and frisky, increasingly so as the 90 minute evening wore on. And the nimble, up-for-anything band, which currently features Tony Garnier on bass, George Receli on drums, and, in their front mans elocution, Stu Kimball on rhythm gee-tar, Donnie Herron on steel gee-tar, and Charlie Sexton on lead gee-tar, is as good as its been in a decade. And if you could only understand select lines as the singer scratched and moaned and bellowed his way with feeling through a revved-up and rumbling Thunder On The Mountain, powerfully doomy Ballad Of A Thin Man, or boldly ringing, satisfying sneering Like A Rolling Stone, well, that was okay. Because you knew all the words anyway. http://www.philly.com/philly/blogs/inthemix/Review-Bob-Dylan-at-the-Mann.html

Voldar: Bob Dylan's Boston House Of Blues set list, plus summer tour summary Just got back from Bob Dylan's amazing show in Boston. Here's the set list: House Of Blues: Boston, Massachusetts August 21, 2011 (Approximately 8 to 9:45 p.m.) 1. Leopard-Skin Pill-Box Hat 2. Don't Think Twice, It's All Right 3. Things Have Changed 4. Tangled Up In Blue 5. Beyond Here Lies Nothin' 6. Mississippi 7. Summer Days 8. Tryin' To Get To Heaven 9. High Water (For Charley Patton) 10. Simple Twist Of Fate 11. Highway 61 Revisited 12. Blind Willie McTell 13. Thunder On The Mountain 14. Ballad Of A Thin Man // 15. Like A Rolling Stone 16. All Along The Watchtower 17. Blowin' In The Wind Will write a review as soon as time allows, but Dylan was in a good mood, often smiling - even laughing at certain points. Great venue, great sound, extra songs. Here's the summary of performances from this summer's North American tour (38 songs, 28 shows): (Song title, concert - see bottom.) All Along The Watchtower 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 Ballad Of A Thin Man 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 Ballad Of Hollis Brown 17 22 27 Beyond Here Lies Nothin' 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 Blind Willie McTell 19 21 23 25 27 28 Blowin' In The Wind 1 2 3 8 9 10 12 13 14 15 28 Cold Irons Bound 5 6 7 8 9 21 24 Desolation Row 4 16 20 21 25 26 Don't Think Twice, It's All Right 1 2 8 11 12 18 25 27 28 Forever Young 6 Forgetful Heart 1 2 3 5 9 10 12 13 15 Girl From The North Country 16 Gonna Change My Way Of Thinking 1 2 A Hard Rain's A-Gonna Fall 1 2 11 High Water (for Charley Patton) 1 2 10 13 15 20 23 26 28 Highway 61 Revisited 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 If You Ever Go To Houston 1 4 5 6 7 It Ain't Me, Babe 3 4 10 20 It's All Over Now, Baby Blue 5 6 7 9 13 14 15 24 John Brown 19 24 Leopard-Skin Pill-Box Hat 3 4 10 12 13 16 18 19 21 22 23 25 26 28 The Levee's Gonna Break 1 5 11 12 15 16 17 22 25 Like A Rolling Stone 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 The Lonesome Death Of Hattie Carroll 17 22 27 Love Minus Zero/No Limit 19 Mississippi 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 Rainy Day Women # 12 & 35 5 6 7 8 9 11 14 15 17 20 24 27 Simple Twist Of Fate 1 3 4 6 7 8 9 10 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 Spirit On The Water 26 Sugar Baby 2 3 4 6 7 8 9 11 12 13 14 15 Summer Days 2 3 4 6 7 8 14 18 19 20 23 24 28 Tangled Up In Blue 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 Things Have Changed 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 Thunder On The Mountain 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 To Ramona 17 21 22 23 26 Tryin' To Get To Heaven 2 5 8 16 18 28 Tweedle Dee & Tweedle Dum 4 16 18 Visions Of Johanna 5 6 7 14 Summer concert schedule (Concert number, date, location, venue): JUL 14 Santa Barbara, CA Santa Barbara Bowl JUL 15 Costa Mesa, CA The Pacific Amphitheatre JUL 16 Las Vegas, NV The Pearl Concert Theater at the Palms JUL 18 Phoenix, AZ Comerica Theatre JUL 19 Tucson, AZ Anselmo Valencia Tori Amphitheatre JUL 21 Albuquerque, NM Hard Rock Casino Presents: The Pavilion JUL 23 Thackerville, OK WinStar World Casino JUL 24 New Braunfels, TX Whitewater Amphitheater JUL 26 New Orleans, LA UNO Lakefront Arena JUL 27 Pensacola, FL Pensacola Civic Center JUL 28 Atlanta, GA Chastain Park Amphitheater JUL 30 Memphis, TN Mud Island Amphitheatre AUG 1 Nashville, TN Ryman Auditorium AUG 2 Evansville, IN Roberts Stadium AUG 3 Toledo, OH Toledo Zoo Amphitheater AUG 5 Kettering, OH Fraze Pavilion AUG 6 Cleveland, OH Jacobs Pavilion at Nautica AUG 7 Rochester Hills, MI Meadow Brook AUG 9 Canandaigua, NY Constellation Brands-Marvin Sands PAC AUG 10 Scranton, PA Toyota Pavilion AUG 12 Bethel, NY Bethel Woods Center for the Arts AUG 13 Wantagh, NY Jones Beach Theater AUG 14 Asbury Park, NJ Asbury Park Convention Hall AUG 16 Columbia, MD Merriweather Post Pavilion AUG 17 Philadelphia, PA Mann Music Center AUG 19 Gilford, NH Meadowbrook U.S. Cellular Pavilion AUG 20 Bangor, ME Bangor Waterfront Pavilion AUG 21 Boston, MA House of Blues http://www.examiner.com/bob-dylan-in-national/bob-dylan-s-boston-house-of-blues-set-list-plus-summer-tour-summary

Voldar: Bob Dylans country Now that weve put paid to the most distinctive U.S. regional accents the peppery New York dialect (The Moscow News, 05/03/11); the smooth-as-syrup Southern variant (11/07/11); and the New England clam chowder/Boston baked bean version (25/07/11) its high time we turned to Americas non-distinctive regional accent, the linguistic amalgam that has become the most widespread and widely imitated U.S. variety: Midwestern English. This is the version that will likely serve Russians acquiring English best. It also happens to be the native dialect of Prof. Extreme himself, although this coincidence has nothing to do with his descriptions of the three others as grating, twangy, and for knuckle-draggers wearing bib overalls. Seriously, Midwestern has long been the default version of American English, and mastery of it acts as a kind of Great Equalizer both for people learning the language and for those functioning within it. It is the standard for Hollywood and the news networks, a pleasing vanilla that no one objects to. How could they? Its everybodys linguistic property the democratic choice for the whole republic. So cue the Star Spangled Banner and lets take a closer look Go West, young Yanks Variously called General American, Middle American and Standard American, the Midwestern version of U.S. English differs in breadth of origin from its regional counterparts: Midwestern is more a hybrid, a second wave accent that developed from the intermingling of speech patterns among linguistically disparate settlers as they came together during the move westward from the Atlantic seaboard into the Ohio Valley and beyond. The beyond, of course, was a big one: great numbers of Midwesterners migrated to California and the Pacific Northwest after the Civil War (1861-65), taking their increasingly- generic English with them and in the process rendering it the nations unaccented variant. Despite this pan-Americanism, certain properties of todays basic Midwestern accent are area-specific, with various experts citing eastern Nebraska, southern and central Iowa and much of Illinois as the true dialectical heartland; there is also a recognizable Northern Tier version common to Wisconsin, Minnesota and the Dakotas. In terms of universality, Michiganders have been known to claim that the speech of national broadcasters is modeled on their dialect. To which I would add an Extreme Harrumph but its rather un-Midwestern to argue, so lets move on. The great leveler As the one-dialect-fits-all variant, Midwestern English tends to round, flatten and otherwise mute the sharp particularities of other dialects. Two salient features to note are: The honest R one thats always pronounced, whether at the beginning, middle or end of a word, and never added where it doesnt occur naturally (in a words written form). New Englanders, New Yorkers, Southerners and most Brits R-tinkerers, the lot of em get off at this stop. The flat A this is the region-defining vowel, the phoneme that renders class, dance and, well, flat distinctively Midwestern. Anyone whos class [klas] comes out [klahs] or [klah-yuhs] is immediately treated as suspect, if not subversive. A good source on the regional lexicon is The American Midwest: An Interpretive Encyclopedia, which offers such nuggets as shanty (an outdoor toilet), owly (irritable) and the Minnesota-favored expression of disgust Ish! This state, by the way, has become nationally known since the late 1990s as the home of a multiple-word agreement some variant of Yah-sure-you betcha-yah that serves as a friendly caricature of the entire Northern Tier. Go ahead, give it a listen For a fee, sites such as accenthelp.com (Learn the Central Plains Midwest Accent) and generalamericanaccent. com (offering a training tool for anyone wishing to speak with a Neutral American Accent) will be happy to put both English acquirers and Americans with regional dialects into the Midwestern swing of things. Prof. Extreme says, in his unobtrusive Midwestern way, enjoy their free online samples; the rest is your business. (NB: if your current English teacher is an American, the chances are good that youre already learning the accent these places are selling.) An oft-cited paradigm of Midwestern English is the late network newsman Walter Cronkite, whose three decades-plus of national prominence did much to consolidate the accent as everybodys. Enter Cronkite: In His Own Words on YouTube and youll get a fine lesson in Midwestern for free, with a voice, tonality and cadence all worth imitating. For some amusing amateur instruction, YouTube How to talk EXTREME Midwestern and Minnesota accent. The recurrence of Minnesota here is neither accidental nor mysterious: the Coen brothers multiple-Oscar-winning Fargo (1996) made the whole country aware of the regional quirks of Minnesota-speak. See the entire film, by all means, but for the moment check out Fargo Hookers and Fargo yeah on YouTube. Youll see that this state produced not only the Renaissance man of American popular music, Bob Dylan who called the Midwest the country I come from but also a kind of seriocomic, folksy earnestness that any region, or any other country, might well admire, yah? http://themoscownews.com/extreme_english/20110822/188946834.html

Voldar: Don't Be a Bob Dylan Superfan! My boyfriend Damon and I were in Philadelphia last week and his friend David picked us up to take us to a Bob Dylan show in Asbury Park. As we drove, I told David about the first time I saw Dylan. It was 1990, and I was 14 and couldn't name any Dylan songs beyond "Like a Rolling Stone." But when Dylan stepped onto the stage and started singing, I feel in love in the deepest sense of the word. My soul had found its mirror. An avid reader, I had not yet found Rimbaud or Baudelaire. And so Dylan was the first person I encountered in my life that clearly understood the ineffability of language. By the time the show ended, I was entirely convinced that Bob Dylan was my best friend. In the following weeks and years I bought a dozen cassette tapes of Dylan albums. I listened to them endlessly. I bought a hefty volume of Dylan lyrics and spent evenings and weekends pouring over them. I was convinced that if, as I stood in the audience at one of his shows, Dylan laid eyes on me, he would understand me completely and know in his core that we were best friends. My big sister, with whom I shared a room at the time, bore the brunt of this crazy talk. I hung onto the belief that Bob Dylan was my best friend all through high school and college. It dissipated around the time I turned 21 and was gone entirely soon after. I have remained a Dylan fan all my life; but have never again been a superfan. David laughed at this story. He said that while I had grown out of my delusions, he had talked to a few Dylan fans who hadn't. David, Damon and I arrived at Asbury Park a good four hours before the doors opened. A motley group of fans had already assembled in line. As we waited, David chatted with Dylan superfans he had met at other shows. He pointed out an avid fan standing near the very front of the line, a baby boomer with generous boobs and long brown hair hanging in two braids tied with red bows. She looked innocuous and not at all out of place. Her name, David said, was Trixsee. When the doors finally opened, we hurried in to stand in the second row of people packing in against the rail for the General Admission show. Squeezed in together against the stage after having waited for hours to get in, the bunch of us quickly developed a feeling of camaraderie. We all pressed in close for Leon Russell's opening act. And then we waited as Dylan's roadies set up the stage for him. And then, just as Bob Dylan came onto the stage, Trixsee came pushing and shoving from off to the side somewhere to plant herself directly in front of us. The happy energy of the crowd around us shifted as people protested Trixsee shoving her way into the space we had diligently homesteaded. The 20-something girl in braces in front of me, and her previously cheerful boyfriend both began to scream at Trixsee to get away from her squatted position in front of the stage. "I've seen her do this at other shows!" the young man yelled. "Get her out of here." "Bob wants me here. I'm here with Bob," Trixsee screamed. "Then why aren't you up there? " the girl with braces yelled back, gesturing at the stage. "I don't want to be!" Trixsee screamed. "I'm so sure!" the girl with braces said. For a moment it seemed the tightly packed crowd would mutiny and try to shove Trixsee out of the way, but things settled down and we all turned our attention back to Bob Dylan, who was playing better than any of us had seen him play in years. He had his I-Give-a-Sh*t pants on tight and was alternately playing keyboard and singing in front of the mic while doing little dance moves. He even played guitar on a few songs and punched out his familiar lyrics with a new zest; and we were all drinking it down. But Trixsee continued to be a distraction. She shook her ass and her hefty bosoms and screamed enthusiastically and bumped into the people around her with her elbows. David, who stood directly to the side and behind her, was taking the brunt of her wiggling. Every time I looked over at the two of them -- Trixsee's face bright with joy, the David's dark with annoyance -- I started to laugh. I had never seen a woman so capable of sucking the joy out of the people around her. By the end of the show, Trixsee was screaming at the top of her voice at Dylan, "Yeah, baby! Yeah, baby! Yeah, baby! YOU'RE MINE!!!!" The crowd around her rolled their eyes at each other and tried to focus on what was happening on the stage. I felt sure Trixsee must be the nuttiest Dylan fan on earth. But then, during the encore, a pretty blonde 30-something elbowed her way towards the front of the stage. She asked David if she could stand in front of him. "Sure," he said. "If you'll be sure and elbow her." He gestured at Trixsee. The blonde swore that she would. The blonde pulled a rolled up piece of paper tied carefully with ribbon from a plastic bag. "I wrote five notes for Bob!" she screamed for the benefit of anyone close enough to hear. She cocked her arm back to toss the first note onto the stage, but stood there frozen, waiting until Dylan glanced in our direction. "I want him to see me!" she screamed. "I want him to see me!" When Dylan looked more or less her way, she lobbed the first note onto the stage, reaching into her bag for another. "I wrote my phone number on them!" she yelled. After the show, as David, Damon and I left the Asbury Park Convention Center, we talked more about Trixsee and the blonde woman's bizarre behavior than we did about the show. As we talked, I wondered why -- with such an early start as an obsessive Dylan nut -- I had been blessed with growing out of being a Bob Dylan superfan. Curious to find out more about Trixsee, a woman with the power and ability to ruin a Bob Dylan show for him, the next day David started emailing other Bob Dylan fans to ask about her. The emails he received in return all stated clearly that Trixsee was the worst and craziest of all Dylan fans, and routinely wreaked havoc on other fans' enjoyment of the shows with her loud, pushy, inconsiderate behavior. But Trixsee's true sin, one email said, was to drive Dylan himself away from his own followers. The email recounted the following story: One time Bob came out and was talking with some fans, including Trixsee, and Trixsee asked him if he was breastfed as a baby. Dylan hurried away from the group saying, 'That's why I don't talk to my fans.' Bob Dylan likely doesn't look at his super fans and see himself reflected in them. He doesn't look at them and see lifelong best friends or future lovers. He looks at them and sees people who know his voice, who know his words. But he doesn't know their voices; and he certainly doesn't want to know their words. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/mary-pauline-lowry/dont-be-a-bob-dylan-super_b_935691.html

Voldar: Pink Floyd's Roger Waters on Bob Dylan, plus 'Knockin' On Heaven's Door' cover George Roger Waters was born on September 6, 1943, in Leatherhead, Surrey, England. He's best known as a founding member of Pink Floyd, eventually taking a leadership role after the 1968 departure of Syd Barrett. Waters left the band in 1985 to pursue a solo career, while the other members continued with the name, music, and props, over his objections. Relations between the surviving members have warmed somewhat in recent years, with various permutations of the band performing at isolated events. The music of Bob Dylan and Pink Floyd is not as diametrically opposed as it might first appear. For starters, they were both steeped in American music, most notably Rhythm and Blues, then went on to compose and perform more lengthy, mind-expanding, ground-breaking music. However, there is not much crossover in the careers of Dylan and the members of Pink Floyd. Barrett wrote his original song "Bob Dylan Blues" sometime between 1962 and 1964. According to Julian Palacios' 1998 book, Lost In The Woods, a young Syd Barrett saw Bob Dylan in London, with his girlfriend, Libby Gausden. It states that Barrett saw Dylan's first major London show in March of 1963, but there is no evidence of such a performance. It must have been either Royal Festival Hall in 1964, or one of a handful of smaller gigs between mid-December 1962 and early January 1963. Since the Waters/Floyd split, Pink Floyd is known to have covered "Like A Rolling Stone" at a soundcheck in Tampa, Florida, on the fifth day of May, 1994, according to Dylan Covers. Meanwhile, Waters recorded his version of "Knockin' On Heaven's Door" for the score of the late 1990s Israeli film The Dybbuk of the Holy Apple Field. It was also included on 1998's Flickering Flame: The Solo Years Volume 1. Here are some comments from Waters about Dylan: You can draw a line between what I'm interested in and what I'm not interested in. On one side you can name Dylan and Lennon, who observe the world and have feelings, and write songs directly from those feelings. On the vapid side you have pop groups who need material and write songs to fill the hole, rather than getting somebody else... I always question stuff I do. There's a moment after making a demo of a song and sticking it on in the car when I really get off on it, but it doesn't last very long. And then when it's in a finished record and you listen to it once or twice, it's there, but again, it doesn't last. I think it is in the nature of all people who do these things - in the Lennon, the Dylan, the Pete Townshend manner, that come from the heart - that the gratification doesn't stay with you and you feel compelled to go start the process all over again. - Musician, November, 1992. Brian from Rochester, N.Y.: Hello Roger, it's quite an honour to speak to you and it's been well worth the wait for the Amused To Death album. I have two questions for you tonight. The first one, in the song "Too Much Rope" you say "Each man has his price Bob, and yours is pretty low". Are you referring to Bob Ezrin? Roger Waters: Strangely enough, a lot of the lyrics I write now I write directly onto tape by putting some music down on a track and then going into the studio and running the tape and singing directly without thinking too much about what it is. And those verses of "Too Much Rope", I did like that. The reference when I actually put the word down on tape was to Bob Dylan because at the time, I was going through a kind of Bob Dylan sound-alike period to amuse myself in the studio. Uh, so I would be singing (Dylan style) "Each man has his price Bob", like that. For a joke. But afterwards it seemed to me a rather appertain lyric for Bob Ezrin so I left it in because of Ezrin as a little gift for Bob Ezrin. Yeah. Bob Cockburn: So, Dylan in mind but if it works the other way, no problem with that either, huh? Roger Waters: (Dylan-esque) That's right. That's right. - Rockline, Westwood One, February, 1993 Q) Did you feel any sense of of common cause with the Punks, or understand why they were doing what they did? Roger Waters: Do you know, I`ve never been very interested in modern music. I might find some of it enjoyable, but it`s never really been interesting. I never really heard the Clash, and certainly not the Sex Pistols, so I can`t really answer that question. As I still am now, I was listening to Neil Young when all that happened. It passed me by. I`ll always listen to a new Dylan album. But it takes an awful lot of something for anyone else to break in to what I listen to. - Q special edition October 2004 on Pink Floyd Mark Sainsbury: What modern-day music do you think might last the test of time? Roger Waters: Do you know to be perfectly honest with you I don't really listen to very much music and certainly not much contemporary pop music anyway. It's not to say that I don't think it's any good. It's just my interest lies in other areas. I still listen to music and I listen to a lot of classical music and I have my few favourite sort of song writers who, when they produce new work, I'll sort of listen to it. So I always buy the new Dylan album and the new Neil Young album and the new John Prine album and I'll sniff around one or two other things if I catch something on the radio. But by in large I'm not really interested in it. TVNZ, January 23, 2007 I came to Olympiysky at 18:30. During the soundcheck I heard mostly songs of Bob Dylan. After three songs I felt that Bob Dylan got me bored (as for me, his music is very specific)... And the people were coming, Bob Dylan songs were followed by John Lennon's "Mother" and "Imagine". The last moment before the show was some woman's speech about that there shoudn't be flash and fireworks unless the apparatus could come undone. - A fan's soundcheck observation from Roger Waters' April 23, 2011, concert at Moscow's Olympyisky. Waters hired Dylan's first guitarist from the Never Ending Tour, G.E. Smith, in late 2010, to play in Waters' 2010-11 The Wall tour. Smith once appeared with David Gilmour, when the Pink Floyd guitarist jammed with the Saturday Night Live band on December 12, 1987. Waters also enlisted the following Dylan-related artist to participate in 1990s The Wall - Live In Berlin: Sinead O'Connor, Marianne Faithfull, Van Morrison, Joni Mitchell, and The Band. You can hear Waters' cover of "Knockin' On Heaven's Door" by clicking on the embedded clip on the left: Vocals: Roger Waters Keyboards: Simon Chamberlain Electric/acoustic guitar: Clem Clempson Backing vocals: Katie Kissoon and Doreen Chanter Produced by Nick Griffiths http://www.examiner.com/bob-dylan-in-national/bob-dylan-roger-waters-and-knockin-on-heaven-s-door

Voldar: Bob Dylan begins autumn tour with Mark Knopfler in Dublin Bob Dylan's fall European tour started earlier tonight at Dublin's O2 arena. As far as I can tell, he did not plagiarize his songs (at least not any more that usual). No major changes since the summer tour. You can see a summary of last summer's tour performances at the end of this article. Oct 6, 2011 Dublin, Ireland O2 Arena 1. Leopard-Skin Pill-Box Hat 2. Don't Think Twice, It's All Right 3. Things Have Changed 4. Tangled Up In Blue 5. Beyond Here Lies Nothin' 6. Spirit On The Water 7. The Levee's Gonna Break 8. Desolation Row 9. Highway 61 Revisited 10. Forgetful Heart 11. Thunder On The Mountain 12. Ballad Of A Thin Man // 13. Like A Rolling Stone 14. All Along The Watchtower en of these songs were played at Dylan's previous show at Boston's House of Blues on August 21. The opening act was Mark Knopfler, which probably explains the 14 song set. According to the Desolation Row Information Service, Knopfler played for about an hour, starting at 7:30. Dylan's set started at 9:20, about 20 minutes late, with no change in the line up. Knopfler's set list, courtesy of Karl-Heinz Meurer (via Expecting Rain Discussions): Mark Knopfler (ca. 65 minutes): ------------------------------------ 01 Why Aye Man 02 Cleaning My Gun 03 [new song] 04 Sailing To Philadelphia 05 Hill Farmer's Blues 06 [new song] 07 Song For Sonny Liston 08 Done With Bonaparte 09 Speedway At Nazareth Dylan is not playing tomorrow night on Yom Kippur, but returns to the stage after sundown on October 8 at Braehead Arena in Glasgow, Scotland. Here's the summary of performances from this summer's North American tour (38 songs, 28 shows): (Song title, concert - see bottom.) 1. All Along The Watchtower 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 2. Ballad Of A Thin Man 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 3. Ballad Of Hollis Brown 17 22 27 4. Beyond Here Lies Nothin' 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 5. Blind Willie McTell 19 21 23 25 27 28 6. Blowin' In The Wind 1 2 3 8 9 10 12 13 14 15 28 7. Cold Irons Bound 5 6 7 8 9 21 24 8. Desolation Row 4 16 20 21 25 26 9. Don't Think Twice, It's All Right 1 2 8 11 12 18 25 27 28 10. Forever Young 6 11. Forgetful Heart 1 2 3 5 9 10 12 13 15 12. Girl From The North Country 16 13. Gonna Change My Way Of Thinking 1 2 14. A Hard Rain's A-Gonna Fall 1 2 11 15. High Water (for Charley Patton) 1 2 10 13 15 20 23 26 28 16. Highway 61 Revisited 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 17. If You Ever Go To Houston 1 4 5 6 7 18. It Ain't Me, Babe 3 4 10 20 19. It's All Over Now, Baby Blue 5 6 7 9 13 14 15 24 20. John Brown 19 24 21. Leopard-Skin Pill-Box Hat 3 4 10 12 13 16 18 19 21 22 23 25 26 28 22. The Levee's Gonna Break 1 5 11 12 15 16 17 22 25 23. Like A Rolling Stone 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 24. The Lonesome Death Of Hattie Carroll 17 22 27 25. Love Minus Zero/No Limit 19 26. Mississippi 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 27. Rainy Day Women # 12 & 35 5 6 7 8 9 11 14 15 17 20 24 27 28. Simple Twist Of Fate 1 3 4 6 7 8 9 10 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29. Spirit On The Water 26 30. Sugar Baby 2 3 4 6 7 8 9 11 12 13 14 15 31. Summer Days 2 3 4 6 7 8 14 18 19 20 23 24 28 32. Tangled Up In Blue 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 33. Things Have Changed 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 34. Thunder On The Mountain 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 35. To Ramona 17 21 22 23 26 36. Tryin' To Get To Heaven 2 5 8 16 18 28 37. Tweedle Dee & Tweedle Dum 4 16 18 38. Visions Of Johanna 5 6 7 14 Summer concert schedule (Concert number, date, location, venue): 1. JUL 14 Santa Barbara, CA Santa Barbara Bowl 2. JUL 15 Costa Mesa, CA The Pacific Amphitheatre 3. JUL 16 Las Vegas, NV The Pearl Concert Theater at the Palms 4. JUL 18 Phoenix, AZ Comerica Theatre 5. JUL 19 Tucson, AZ Anselmo Valencia Tori Amphitheatre 6. JUL 21 Albuquerque, NM Hard Rock Casino Presents: The Pavilion 7. JUL 23 Thackerville, OK WinStar World Casino 8. JUL 24 New Braunfels, TX Whitewater Amphitheater 9. JUL 26 New Orleans, LA UNO Lakefront Arena 10. JUL 27 Pensacola, FL Pensacola Civic Center 11. JUL 28 Atlanta, GA Chastain Park Amphitheater 12. JUL 30 Memphis, TN Mud Island Amphitheatre 13. AUG 1 Nashville, TN Ryman Auditorium 14. AUG 2 Evansville, IN Roberts Stadium 15. AUG 3 Toledo, OH Toledo Zoo Amphitheater 16. AUG 5 Kettering, OH Fraze Pavilion 17. AUG 6 Cleveland, OH Jacobs Pavilion at Nautica 18. AUG 7 Rochester Hills, MI Meadow Brook 19. AUG 9 Canandaigua, NY Constellation Brands-Marvin Sands PAC 20. AUG 10 Scranton, PA Toyota Pavilion 21. AUG 12 Bethel, NY Bethel Woods Center for the Arts 22. AUG 13 Wantagh, NY Jones Beach Theater 23. AUG 14 Asbury Park, NJ Asbury Park Convention Hall 24. AUG 16 Columbia, MD Merriweather Post Pavilion 25. AUG 17 Philadelphia, PA Mann Music Center 26. AUG 19 Gilford, NH Meadowbrook U.S. Cellular Pavilion 27. AUG 20 Bangor, ME Bangor Waterfront Pavilion 28. AUG 21 Boston, MA House of Blues http://www.examiner.com/bob-dylan-in-national/bob-dylan-begins-autumn-tour-with-mark-knopfler-dublin

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Voldar: . Dylan&Knopfler concert o2 dublin 6th october 2011

Voldar: Bob Dylan box set of singles to crawl out on Record Store Day Columbia/Legacy will be issuing a limited edition box set of Bob Dylan 45 r.p.m. singles, titled Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window?, for Record Store Day 2011's Black Friday. Here's the information: Format: 7" Vinyl Box Set Label: Columbia/Legacy Release type: Box set of four 7" singles, limited, numbered, includes Dylan sticker. Track listing: "Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window"/"Highway 61" "Positively 4th St."/"From A Buick Six" "Like a Rolling Stone"/"Gates of Eden" "Subterranean Homesick Blues"/"She Belongs To Me" There will be a limited run of 5,000 sets, made only for the United States market. http://www.examiner.com/bob-dylan-in-national/bob-dylan-box-set-of-singles-for-record-store-day

Voldar: In Luxembourg, Mark Knopfler joins Bob Dylan on stage for first three songs In another surprise on his summer tour, Bob Dylan was joined on stage in Luxembourg earlier tonight by Mark Knopfler for the first three songs of his headlining set. This is the twelfth night of the tour, but only the second gig where Knopfler shared the stage with Dylan. The previous time, one week ago in Bournemouth, Knopfler, unannounced, played guitar on Dylan's "Beyond Here Lies Nothin'." Tonight, Knopfler was there from the beginning, staying for "Leopard-Skin Pill-Box Hat," "It's All Over Now, Baby Blue", and "Things Have Changed." Here's the set list, courtesy Bob Links: Esch-sur-Alzette, Luxembourg Rockhal October 21, 2011 1. Leopard-Skin Pill-Box Hat (Mark Knopfler on guitar) 2. It's All Over Now, Baby Blue (Bob Dylan and Mark Knopfler on guitars) 3. Things Have Changed (Mark Knopfler on guitar) 4. Tangled Up In Blue 5. Honest With Me 6. Make You Feel My Love 7. The Levee's Gonna Break 8. Desolation Row 9. Highway 61 Revisited 10. Forgetful Heart (Donnie on violin) 11. Thunder On The Mountain 12. Ballad Of A Thin Man 13. All Along The Watchtower 14. Like A Rolling Stone The Knopfler fan site, A Mark In Time, has already linked to a video from the show. You can watch four short clips in the embedded links on the left, including two with Dylan and Knopfler. http://www.examiner.com/bob-dylan-in-national/in-luxembourg-mark-knopfler-joins-bob-dylan-on-stage-for-first-three-songs

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Voldar: Stuck inside of a mobile device with the Dylan live in Hamburg blues again Earlier tonight in Hamburg, Germany, where Bob Dylan headlined at the O2 World arena, Mark Knopfler guested on the first four or five songs, including the tour debut of "Boots of Spanish Leather." At time of posting, Bob Links lists four songs with Knopfler, while A Mark In Time reports five. The embedded video clip at the left indicates that Knopfler did indeed play on the fifth song, "The Levee's Gonna Break," which means that he was on stage with Dylan for about half an hour. In addition, "Man In The Long Black Coat" was played for the third time on the tour, but this was the first with Knopfler. Later in the set, after Knopfler left, "Rollin' and Tumblin'" also made its first appearance. According to the Knopfler fan site A Mark In Time, the Dylan segment (and at least part of Knopfler's opening set) was broadcast live from a moblie device at Bambuster , where it had been archived at the time of this post. Bob Dylan's set list, courtesy Bob Links, Setlist.fm and A Mark In Time (and Bambuster): 1. Leopard-Skin Pill-Box Hat / w Mark K. 2. Boots of Spanish Leather / w Mark K. 3. Things Have Changed / w Mark K. 4. Man In The Long Black Coat / w Mark K. 5. The Levee's Gonna Break / w Mark K. 6. Not Dark Yet 7. Rollin' And Tumblin' 8. A Hard Rain's A-Gonna Fall 9. Highway 61 Revisited 10. Forgetful Heart 11. Thunder On The Mountain 12. Ballad Of A Thin Man 13. All Along The Watchtower 14. Like A Rolling Stone http://www.examiner.com/bob-dylan-in-national/stuck-inside-of-a-mobile-device-with-the-dylan-live-hamburg-blues-again

Voldar: Bob Dylan and Mark Knopfler play final 2011 Germany gig Earlier tonight in Nuremberg, Bob Dylan and Mark Knopfler played the 23rd show of their autumn tour. It was also the eight and final show in Germany. Dylan has played Nuremberg before, in West Germany in 1978 and 1987, then in a united Germany in 1998 and 2002. Dylan appears to have gotten himself into a groove, with Knopfler joining in on guitar during the first four songs of tonight's headlining set, no tour debuts, and, in this case, no encore of "Blowin' In The Wind." So far, Dylan has played 49 different songs on this fall tour. Still to go: Austria, Italy, Switzerland, and London, England. Set lists, courtesy of Bob Links and A Mark In Time: Nuremberg Arena, Germany: November 7, 2011 Bob Dylan 1. Leopard-Skin Pill-Box Hat (Mark Knopfler on guitar) 2. It's All Over Now, Baby Blue (Mark Knopfler on guitar) 3. Things Have Changed (Mark Knopfler on guitar) 4. Mississippi (Mark Knopfler on guitar) 5. Honest With Me 6. Tangled Up In Blue 7. The Levee's Gonna Break 8. Desolation Row 9. Highway 61 Revisited 10. Man In The Long Black Coat 11. Thunder On The Mountain 12. Ballad Of A Thin Man 13. All Along The Watchtower 14. Like A Rolling Stone Mark Knopfler 1. Why Aye Man 2. Cleaning My Gun 3. Sailing to Philadelphia 4. Hill Farmer's Blue 5. Privateering 6. Song for Sonny Liston 7. Haul Away 8. Marbletown 9. Brothers in Arms 10. Speedway at Nazareth 11. So Far Away http://www.examiner.com/bob-dylan-in-national/bob-dylan-and-mark-knopfler-s-last-2011-gig-germany

Voldar: A review of Bob Dylan and Mark Knopfler in Padova, Italy, last night Mark Knopfler influences Bob Dylans performances A review by "Mr. Tambourine." A great Bob Dylan took the stage at the Palasport Arcella in Padua, Italy, last night. The concert was more than good, it almost reached greatness - Bob and the band, all engaged and charged at the same point. Good sound, clean and complimentary, with an excellent collection of musicians on stage. With Mark on the bill, it was even better because Knopflers tone was more crystalline and less heavy, even if the Celtic music was a little foreign to my ears. A musician worthy of sharing the bill with Bob. Bob, the elder statesman, was in perfect shape and great voice. He played excellent harmonica licks dropped perfectly into the songs, with the keyboard maybe a little less so (but we all know that Bob is not really what people call a "monster of the keyboard). Knopflers guest appearance in Bobs set transformed those songs. They felt special, with Mark playing some very sweet Elvis-style solos which added a kindness and sensitivity that was a sharp contrast to Charlie Sextons guitar style. Tony Garnier was good as always, and George Recile, Stu Kimball, and Donnie Herron played together in excellent anonymity. Even Bob appeared to give much more when Mark was at his side. The set list was predictable, but the performances were not. The highlights were Man In The Long Black Coat and a fascinating version of Desolation Row, played and sung with a special echo effect on Bobs voice. Even the "routine songs" like Highway 61, Watchtower, and Rolling Stone, were all exciting and energetic. Unfortunately, the Palasport Arcella was not sold out, perhaps due to the multiple midweek round of Italian shows, or maybe an alarm bell went off due to the high ticket prices. We will see if this happens again at the upcoming shows in Rome, Florence and Milan. The Padua audience was composed mostly of subdued Padua citizens, with a few foreigners mixed in. It was too bad really, as the quality of the show deserved more. Ciao, Mr.Tambourine http://www.examiner.com/bob-dylan-in-national/a-review-of-bob-dylan-and-mark-knopfler-padova-italy-last-night

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Voldar: Review of Dylan at Hammersmith November 2011 I thought Id write a wrap-up review of the last few shows on the Dylan/Knopfler tour, focusing especially on the last show, but also touching on the entire tour, and where the Never Ending Tour is at (for me) as 2011 draws to a close. Essentially this has been a good tour. By any standards. But especially by the standard of Dylans last few half-decade or so of touring. My opinion is that there has been a steady improvement since 2009, following a steady decline since 2001. That decline was very gradual though, and there were great periods within it, eg Fall 2002, Fall 2003, the likes of Bonnaroo, Barrowlands 2004, Fall 2005 with the altered band line-up, Fall 2006 which had the fillip of the Modern Times songs, etc etc. But 2007, 2008 were not so great really, so its been good to see a steady improvement since then. However that does not mean his voice has improved. Far from it! The Dylan we see on stage today does not have anywhere near the vocal range of the late 90s/early 00s, nor even that of 2005. Coupled with this problem was that he seemed to get so fed up of singing some songs that he began to phrase them in ever more bizarre ways. In the heyday of the N.E.T. this was one of the selling points for regular attendees, the fact that not only did he regularly change the song arrangements, but he also changed the phrasing, often from night to night. But, at that time, the ever changing phrasing seemed to have some point to it, and he usually found some way to make the phrasing fit the song, or whatever emotion he was trying to convey on the particular night. In recent years, while he can still achieve this when he wants to, there have been occasions when the bizarre phrasing didnt seem to make any sense at all. Some songs seem to be guiltier of this than others, eg Hattie Carroll and Hard Rain. So good to see things improve on this front and that he continues to do 'interesting' things with what are left of his vocal chords. All of which brings us to a mild November day in Hammersmith last Monday. The tour had been notable for several reasons. Firstly, of course, having Mark Knopfler as an opening act. Having seen the opening night of the tour in Dublin 6 weeks ago, I had been disappointed he played not one Dire Straits song, so its been good that hes added Brothers in Arms and So Far Away to his set. The rest of his set is pleasant rather than inspirational, the most interesting thing for me being his guitar playing. He has definitely added something to Dylans sets too, as from mid-tour on he joined Dylan every night for the first 3 or 4 numbers, just playing guitar, and making a nice contribution to the bands sound. The other notable thing about the tour is Dylans increased engagement with the audience. From Glasgow onwards he had been out in the middle of the stage much more than usual (up to half the numbers) and in a much more energetic way, moving around almost like a boxer just holding the microphone in one hand and his harmonica/harmonica mike in the other hand and/or using the mike stand as a prop of sorts. This has made the shows considerably more enjoyable visually, and havent hurt the musical performance at all, quite the opposite actually. By the London shows, the level of energy from earlier in the tour had perhaps ebbed a little, but was still very evident on some songs. So, what were the highlights of the London run? Here are a few examples; Mississippi very enjoyable new bouncy arrangement, making this the best live version certainly since 2001 Blind Willie McTell amazingly this is (arguably) even better than the great arrangement he had been using since 1997, now cast in a genre thats hard to define part country, part stomping 1920s dixieland jazz (if that makes any sense!), punctuated (and finished) with some of the best hand-held harmonica youll ever see Man in the Long Black Coat this great song from 1989 has been transformed from a slow atmospheric number to a powerful up-tempo opportunity for Bob to stalk the stage barking out the verses in his best 2011 growl, again with fine harmonica Forgetful Heart Ive seen some amazing versions of this since the song came out on Dylan's last studio album in 2009, but the one on Sunday at Hammersmith probably tops them all. This is 2011 Dylan at his best, and by far the quietest song he performs these days (Dylan concerts are now very loud rock affairs, with very little acoustic or quiet songs). Anyway, he gave this song an incredible vocal in London and performed it very theatrically too, like some kind of torch-song, really communicating with the audience like he used to in 1995 or 1999 or earlier in his career. At times during this performance I felt he was incorporating the spirit of older performers, not the blues/country guys he normally reminds us of but people like Sinatra, Fred Astaire, even Charlie Chaplin. These are just a few highlights lots of other songs were also very well performed over these 3 nights, and my only complaints are that he plays slightly too many by-number rock/rocknroll/blues numbers, and obviously wed like a bit more set-list variation - his set-lists having become a bit more static (by his own high standards of variety that is) in the last couple of years, but this tour saw a small but significant improvement in variety. So overall just a good solid run of shows, ending a very good tour. The final thing I want to talk about before I sign off is the last song of that last show. Up til then it had been a pretty good show, of a similar standard to the previous night, and definitely better than the first Hammersmith show, but now we were to get a performance/moment to take the show to another level. I had been wondering would he ask Knopfler out for one final song, and sure enough there he was, strapping on his red Strat(?) and, adjusting the microphone in the middle of the stage. So, wow we were to get a vocal duet something that had not happened thus far on the tour (he had only played guitar with Bob to this point), and indeed, I cant remember the last time Bob performed an actual proper vocal duet with someone maybe Norah Jones in 2005? Anyway, it really was the special moment that people have been talking about. Ok, perhaps nothing extraordinary musically, but just a very genuine and (presumably) relatively unscripted moment and it led to a lovely communal feeling of warmth spreading across this great old London venue. The song of course was Forever Young Bob taking the 1st verse, Mark the 2nd and sharing the 3rd. As people will know, not just from other reviews but from the youtube vids(!), Knopfler sang the lyric May your heart always be joyful, may your song always be sung, and may you stay forever young right TO Bob, and gestured with his arm to Bob on the line may your song always be sung to which the place erupted. Youd have had to have a heart of stone not to have enjoyed it, and if Knopfler was ever to win over the Dylan audience, he did it right there. The song finished up with a solid harmonica solo from Bob (this tour having seen a very high standard of harmonica playing by the way), and the artists exchanged hugs with Bob giving Mark plenty of acknowledgement, showing friendship and respect between these two artists (and collaborators of old) in equal measure. It was a fitting end to a decent years touring. With no rumours or news yet, who knows what 2012 will hold, but lets hope, as he approaches 71, that he keeps it fresh, enjoys himself and is not done yet. http://samsonsdiner.blogspot.com/2011/11/review-of-dylan-at-hammersmith-november.html

Voldar: . TRUTH ABOUT TAMBOURINE MAN Down the Highway: The Life of Bob Dylan by Howard Sounes (Random House, Rs 699). Dont keep writing poetry, please dont. Go to school and do something constructive get a degree. Fortunately, Bob Dylan paid no heed to this advice dished out by his mother Beatty in 1959. Now in his 60th year, with innumerable pictures and words charting a detailed trajectory of his life, is there anything new left to say about this man? Apparently yes, as this book proves. Three years and 250 interviews thats what Howard Sounes has put into this biography. While Dylan himself, quite predictably, refused to contribute to it, Sounes has done nothing if not a thorough job, researching almost every aspect of this song and dance man. While he maintains a sympathetic voice throughout, Sounes doesnt shy away from breaking down the man before building him up again. In fact, in the opening chapters, Dylan is practically pulled down from his pedestal. We discover his propensity for prevarication. We learn that when he made his way to Denver in the summer of 1960, people avoided the grubby faux hobo and he couldnt get a job to play anywhere. We also learn that the young Bob stole albums from his friends, and how, when he became famous, he would often pretend not to know people who had helped him when he was down and out. Perhaps thats why one of Dylans old friends describes him as a very lonely man. So few people left in the world that he [can] talk to. What ultimately comes through is the image of a wandering musician, fully committed to the Never Ending Tour. Despite his faults and frailties, this performer was born for a life on the road. A peripatetic musician, he often opted to sleep on friends couches, because he liked it, even when he owned several properties. What also comes through is that no matter how many biographers may try, the essence of Dylan what he is about still remains a mystery. As he replied to a question posed in 1966 by Playboy magazine on what his songs were about: Oh, some are about four minutes; some are about five, and some, believe it or not, are about eleven. Thumbs Up: Dylan buffs will love the fact that Sounes manages to ferret out new information on the life of this man whose every move has been scrutinised for the better part of his life. Most notably, he reveals that in 1986 Dylan secretly married one of his backing singers, Carolyn Dennis, who had had his sixth child. While details of this six-year marriage remains a mystery, it does show how adept Dylan was at keeping his life private, making him even more of an enigma. Revelations aside, the book is packed with anecdotes that offer rare glimpses into Dylans life. From the boyish games he played in school to his (busy) sex life, pretty much every fact and story you want to know about the man is contained within the covers of this book. Also, look out for the pictures, which include some of Dylans old loves and several of him performing. Thumbs down: While Souness biography is chock-a-block with information, he loses points on two counts. One, his even-paced, measured style of writing lacks passion at times; previous biographies of Dylan are more stylishly written. Two, strangely enough, while we learn much about Bob the man, the book hardly delves too deep into what made the man who he is his music. For example, Sounes lets the trinity of defining 60s albums Blonde on Blonde, Bringing It All Back Home and Highway 61 Revisited go unexplored. This leaves one with a vaguely unsatisfied feeling that the book doesnt quite manage to get to the heart of Bob Dylan. t2 tip: Dylan fans, if you want to know more about your man, this is your book. You can flip through this tome for years and never exhaust your supply of Dylan trivia. But be warned if Dylan is your god, he may appear significantly more human after reading this book. http://www.telegraphindia.com/1111203/jsp/entertainment/story_14833108.jsp

Voldar: . Bob Dylan Photographic Exhibition http://www.irishtimes.com/indepth/slideshows/dylan-exhibition/