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ЛЕНТА НОВОСТЕЙ БОБ ДИЛАНА - 3

Voldar: В этой теме обсуждаются животрепещушие вопросы современности.

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Voldar: Tour update - Bob Dylan to play Israel and Norway John Baldwin at the Desolation Row Information Service has posted the following Bob Dylan tour dates: From the Promoters this afternoon: * June 20th 2011, Ramat Gan Stadium, Tel Aviv, Israel * June 29th 2011, Bergen Calling, Bergen, Norway * June 30th 2011, Spektrum, Oslo, Norway More information when we get it. Nothing is official until it is posted on Bob Dylan's official site. Dates so far: April 3rd 2011, Nang Gang Exhibition Hall, Taipei, Taiwan April 6th 2011, Workers Gymnasium, Beijing, China April 8th 2011, Grand Stage, Shanghai, China April 10th 2011,Loretta Grounds, RMIT University, Ho Chi Min City, Vietnam April 12th 2011, Star Hall, Kowloon Bay, Hong Kong April 13th 2011, Star Hall, Kowloon Bay, Hong Kong April 15th 2011, Rock & Roots Festival, Marina Promenade, Singapore April 17th 2011, West Coast Blues 'N Roots Festival, Fremantle Park, Perth, Western Australia, Australia. April 19th 2011, Adelaide Entertainment Centre, Adelaide, Australia April 20th 2011, Rod Laver Arena, Melbourne, Australia April 21st 2011, Rod Laver Arena, Melbourne, Australia April 23rd 2011, WIN Entertainment Centre, Wollongong, Australia April 25th 2011, Byron Bay's Bluesfest, Byron Bay, New South Wales, Australia. April 26th 2011, Byron Bay's Bluesfest, Byron Bay, New South Wales, Australia. April 27th 2011, Sydney Entertainment Centre, Sydney, Australia. April 28th 2011, Sydney Entertainment Centre, Sydney, Australia. April 30th 2011, Vector Arena, Auckland, New Zealand. The Full European Tour Dates - From the Promoters this afternoon June 16th 2011, The Marquee, Cork, Ireland June 18th 2011, The Feis, Finsbury Park, London, England June 20th 2011, Ramat Gan Stadium, Tel Aviv, Israel June 22nd 2011, Alcatraz, Milan, Italy June 24th 2011, Sursee, Switzerland June 25th 2011, Volkspark, Mainz, Germany June 26th 2011, Stadtpark, Hamburg, Germany June 27th 2011, Funen Village, Odense, Denmark June 29th 2011, Bergen Calling, Bergen, Norway June 30th 2011, Spektrum, Oslo, Norway July 2nd 2011, Peace and Love Festival, Borlange, Sweden, July 15th 2011, Pacific Amphitheatre, 2011 OC Fair, Orange County, California. http://www.examiner.com/bob-dylan-in-national/tour-update-bob-dylan-to-play-israel-and-norway

Voldar: Google проверил поиск Диланом Новая функция "живого" поиска от интернет-гиганта рекламируется роликом с жизненной балладой классика фолк-рока Новый сервис Google Instant – «живой» поиск от интернет-гиганта, выдающий результаты поиска по мере написания запроса, едва был представлен, а в Google Creative Lab уже создали ролик, демонстрирующий его работу на примере песни «Subterranean Homesick Blues», живого классика фолк-рока Боба Дилана (Bob Dylan). В видео поиск пытается успеть за Диланом, скороговоркой выплескивающим текст песни про проблемы общества в целом и девушки, не способной привыкнуть к миру за пределами школы. Изредка кадры с поиском перемежаются вырезками из оригинального клипа, где Дилан вслед за текстом меняет таблички со словами песни. Отметим, что в гонке за отображением текста песни Google удалось опередить Дилана, который показывал на своих табличках лишь ключевые слова. http://adindex.ru/news/creative/2010/09/13/53524.phtml

Voldar: City's manhole covers honor Bob Dylan DULUTH, Minn. (AP) - "The Times They Are a-Changin"' -- and so are the manhole covers. Bob Dylan's hometown of Duluth, Minnesota, is honoring him in the street. The Duluth News Tribune reports two manhole covers inspired by the lyrics of Dylan's classic tune "Subterranean Homesick Blues," have been cast in iron. They'll be installed later this year on Bob Dylan Way. http://www.nbc-2.com/Global/story.asp?S=13141998 http://www.duluthnewstribune.com/event/article/id/178667/

Voldar: Боб решительно не хочет успокаиваться и к своему туру по Америке добавляет ещё концертов. Bob Dylan tour announces seven more concerts for October, November Bob Dylan and His Band are off the road at the moment, but the legendary musician and his backing band are busy rolling out more concert plans for fall. A total of 19 concerts are now on Dylan's late-year calendar, which opens October 6 at NSU's University Center Arena in Davie, FL. In keeping with the other dates on this leg of Dylan's tour, the shows are mostly slated for U.S. college and university venues. The new seven-date addendum picks up October 24 at the McLeod Center at the University of Northern Iowa in Cedar Falls, IA, and continues through a November 2 performance at the EJ Thomas Performing Arts Hall at the University of Akron in Akron, OH. An October 26 show at Michigan State University in East Lansing and an October 29 stop at Western Michigan University in Kalamazoo are among the campus shows booked for the run. A couple new public venue shows are also set for October 25 at Overture Hall in Madison, WI, and October 31 at Murat Theatre in Indianapolis, IN. Public onsales open September 24 for each of the seven new concerts, and fan club presales will start earlier on September 21, according to Dylan's official Web site. The majority of the new dates have not yet appeared on Ticketmaster.com, but earlier tour stops listed on the site have ticket prices set anywhere from $35 to $67. The iconic singer-songwriter's fall itinerary was initially scheduled to end October 22 at Assembly Hall in Champaign, IL. Onsales for those previously announced performances began over the September 17-19 weekend. Dylan recently completed his summer tour leg with a September 4 set at the 2010 Bumbershoot Festival in Seattle, WA. He had launch the venture a month earlier on August 4 at The Backyard in Austin, TX, and was joined on several dates by fellow singer-songwriter John Mellencamp. October 6 Davie, FL Nova Southeastern University Center Arena October 7 Tampa, FL USF Sun Dome October 8 Gainesville, FL Stephen C. O'Connell Center October 10 Orlando, FL UCF Arena October 11 Tallahassee, FL Tallahassee-Leon County Civic Center October 13 Birmingham, AL BJCC Concert Hall October 14 Charlotte, NC Halton Arena October 16 Winston-Salem, NC Lawrence Joel Veteran Memorial Coliseum October 17 Clemson, SC Littlejohn Coliseum October 19 Nashville, TN Nashville Municipal Auditorium October 21 St. Louis, MO Chaifetz Arena October 22 Champaign, IL Assembly Hall October 24 Cedar Falls, IA McLeod Center * October 25 Madison, WI Overture Hall * October 26 East Lansing, MI MSU Concert Auditorium * October 28 Ann Arbor, MI Hill Auditorium * October 29 Kalamazoo, MI James W. Miller Auditorium * October 31 Indianapolis, IN Murat Theatre * November 2 Akron, OH E.J. Thomas Hall * * new dates http://www.ticketnews.com/news/Bob-Dylan-tour-announces-seven-more-concerts-for-October-November91020673

Voldar: The Bob Dylan - Tony Curtis connection Actor Tony Curtis, born Bernard Schwartz in 1925, the star of Some Like It Hot and father of Jamie Lee Curtis, died on September 29. Bob Dylan mentioned Curtis in his book, Chronicles, Volume One: "The actor Tony Curtis once told me that fame is an occupation in itself, that it is a separate thing. And Tony couldn't be more right.The old image slowly faded and in time I found myself no longer under the canopy of some malignant influence. Eventually different anachronisms were thrust upon me - anachronisms of lesser dilemma - though they might seem bigger. Legend, Icon, Enigma (Buddha in European Clothes was my favorite) - stuff like that, but that was all right. These titles were placid and harmless, threadbare, easy to get around with them. Prophet, Messiah, Savior - those are tough ones." Trivia: Life-size cut-outs of both Dylan and Curtis grace the cover of the Beatles' album, Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band. Tony Curtis played Ira Hayes in the movie, The Outsider. Hayes was the Native American and American Marine who was one of the six men immortalized in the iconic photograph of the flag raising on Iwo Jima during World War II. Bob Dylan's 1970 version of Peter LaFarge's "The Ballad of Ira Hayes" appeared on the 1973 album, Dylan. In Dylan's 1978 movie Renaldo & Clara: Bob Neuwirth, in a mask, is on stage in a small club reading a poem written by a badly disabled black guy named Tony Curtis who sits watching. At the end of the poem Tony Curtis asks for money (asking for money for poems or songs will be a recurring motif in the film.) http://www.examiner.com/bob-dylan-in-national/the-bob-dylan-tony-curtis-connection-1

Voldar: Боб добавил ещё концертов и в ноябре. Bob Dylan has added an extra twelve dates to the upcoming North American leg of his world tour. 2010 has been a quiet year for Bob Dylan, but perhaps he deserves to take a rest. The singer released two new studio albums last year, including a somewhat bizarre Christmas charity record. Alongside this, the singer kept up a tough touring schedule and launched several exhibitions of his artwork. In comparison, 2010 was always going to be a year in the slow lane for the legendary songwriter. Launching a new tour, Bob Dylan has confirmed a new instalment to the Bootleg series. However new material does not seem to be forthcoming after a glut of releases last year, including a number one album. Currently on tour across the United States, Bob Dylan recently experimented with an anti-tout ticket model in San Francisco. The singer refused to allow a pre-sale, meaning that fans had to queue up in person for a ticket to the show. Making life extremely difficult for touts, it is not known if this scheme will be rolled out over the new tour dates. Bob Dylan will start the new leg of the tour on October 6th in Fort Lauderdale, before moving around the country. With the tour running throughout October, the new dates kick off on November 2nd in Akron, Ohio. Ending on November 27th in Atlantic City, other important dates include three nights at Terminal 5. Tickets for the upcoming shows are available now. Bob Dylan is set to play the following shows: November 2 Akron Thomas Performing Arts Hall 3 Kentucky University 4 Columbus Ohio State University 6 Rochester Institute Institute of Technology 7 Pittsburgh University of Pittsburgh 9 Penn State State College 13 Charlotteville University of Virginia 14 Monmouth University 19 Amherst University of Massachusetts 20 Lowell University of Massachusetts - Lowell 22 New York Terminal 5 23 New York Terminal 5 24 New York Terminal 5 26 Atlantic City Borgata Hotel Casino 27 Mashantucket Grand Theater at Foxwoods http://www.clashmusic.com/news/bob-dylan-adds-12-dates-to-north-american-tour

Voldar: Dylan still on never-ending journey "An artist has to be careful never to really arrive at a place where he thinks he's at somewhere. You always have to realize that you're constantly in a state of becoming, and as long as you're in that realm, you'll sort of be all right." Nowhere is Bob Dylan's assessment of his creative philosophy, delivered in Martin Scorsese's 2005 Dylan documentary No Direction Home, more apparent than on the concert stage. In the spotlight, where the iconic American songwriter will be again on Sunday at the UCF Arena, Dylan always has specialized in confounding expectations. In 1965, Dylan alienated and angered his fans by plugging in electric guitars at the Newport Folk Festival, inspiring boos that would be the soundtrack to his performances for several years. As recently as 2006, at the TD Waterhouse Centre, Dylan declined to play guitar at all, leaving it unused on a stand in the middle of the stage as he accompanied himself on electric keyboard. "It's like Newport in reverse!" complained one disappointed friend who considered a Dylan concert without acoustic guitar something close to sacrilege. At the least, one has to wonder: Why would the guy put the guitar in the middle of the stage if he had no intention of playing it? Is he just messing with us? Such complaints likely bounce off the old troubadour, who apparently had a grand time being booed by outraged folk fans in the 1960s. In the Scorsese film, one-time sideman Al Kooper recalls wondering aloud to his boss about whether something ought to be changed to appease the fans. Dylan's response? He loved the ruckus, which he likened to a circus. In the audience, the key to navigating such quirks is to follow the advice I always offer to skeptics at their first Dylan show: "No matter what he looks like, no matter what he sounds like, remember the person you are looking at up there. That is Bob-freaking-Dylan." It's advice that I've needed to force myself to remember from time to time: When the singer played in Orlando in 2002, less than six months after the Sept. 11 attacks, it took half of the first verse before I recognized "Blowin' in the Wind," a song I had sung since grade school. So why keep showing up? And is there a science to appreciating a Dylan concert? Why go? The obvious answer: How often can you see a legitimate legend at work? Here's a guy who sang at the 1963 March on Washington for jobs and freedom, a singer who inspired the Beatles to evolve from mop tops into agents of social change. And there might not be many opportunities left. At 69, Dylan is old enough that the notion of the "Never Ending Tour," as his rigorous road schedule has been known since 1988, can't be taken literally. Like other aging icons such as B.B. King and Tony Bennett, Dylan should be savored. But don't go merely out of historical obligation. Go because there are still flickers of brilliance. Songs such as "Just Like a Woman" and "Positively 4th Street" have evolved with age. The hard edges of a young man have been replaced by a world-weary resignation that allows the singer to tilt the lyrics at appealing angles. And Dylan's touring band is consistently top-notch: The core unit of bassist Tony Garnier, drummer George Receli, lead guitarist Stuart Kimball and multi-instrumentalist Don Herron have been re-joined by guitarist Charlie Sexton, a notable member of the entourage for a few years starting in 1999. Together, the musicians help take the old songs to new places, a worthwhile journey even if Dylan doesn't care much about the final destination. http://www.orlandosentinel.com/entertainment/music/os-cal--bob-dylan-cover-100810-20101007,0,2099130.story P.S. У Боба прикольный парик,а может не парик?

Voldar: Dylan Plays Younger Than 69 The voice is better and the veteran seems to enjoy the sold-out crowd. By BILL DEAN THE GAINESVILLE SUN Published: Monday, October 11, 2010 at 4:28 p.m. Last Modified: Monday, October 11, 2010 at 4:28 p.m. ( page of 3 ) Funny what age can do for a guy. For Bob Dylan, being five months shy of 70 seems to have had the reverse effect of what could be expected, given the evidence of recent years. Dylan working hard to please an audience? The voice of a generation doing three encores and not only acknowledging the crowd but drinking in its adulation like the tab was on the house? And playing more classics than the new stuff and egging the audience to sing along on "Just Like a Woman"? What would Neil Young say, for goodness sake? Well, he might've said "Atta boy, Bob," if he had been in Gainesville on Friday - where the third date of a new Dylan tour played pretty well to a sold-out crowd of almost 6,000 (he also played Tampa on Thursday and Orlando on Sunday). We'll never know whether Dylan had shipped his voice off to vocal-chord camp during his recent time off the road or whether he's simply coming to terms with getting older and embracing what there is while he still has it. But in a show that clocked in at one hour and 50 minutes, he played longer and his voice sounded better than it has in perhaps any time over the last 10 years. (At points during 2001 performances in Tampa and Orlando he literally sounded like Donald Duck with a mouthful of popcorn). The exuberance of kick-starting the show in quick succession with "Rainy Day Women # 12 & 35," "Lay, Lady, Lay," "I'll Be Your Baby Tonight" (from the 1967 album "John Wesley Harding") and "Just Like a Woman" seemed to prime Dylan as much as it did the audience. Though he began the night playing keyboards, Dylan was mobile early, moving to electric guitar in the first song and from guitar to harmonica by the second. On "I'll Be Your Baby Tonight," Dylan and his five-piece band added a juke-joint beat to the original's swaying ramble, and on the later "Tangled Up in Blue," shed that song's see-saw, tumbling acoustic guitar for a jump-blues shuffle syncopated by Dylan's harmonica lines. During one of his most audience-friendly set lists in years - the 16 songs also included "Simple Twist of Fate," "Highway 61 Revisited," "Ballad of a Thin Man," "Like a Rolling Stone" and "All Along the Watchtower," the band fully hit its stride on "Highway 61," pausing long enough for Dylan to spray a burst of keyboard notes in the middle. On "Ballad of a Thin Man," meanwhile, guitarist Charlie Sexton - Dylan's lead axe-man of choice in the early 2000s and now happily back in the fold - played clanging guitar chords to Dylan's blues-harp for a fitting crescendo that ended the song and the regular set on a rousing high point. Dylan's newer material mostly held its own with the old songs. Dylan and band were energized on the rollicking "Thunder on the Mountain" (also from "Modern Times"), which fully deserved its spot two songs after "Highway 61." The three-song encore, which began with the 2009 tune, "Jolene," and ended with "Like a Rolling Stone" and "All Along the Watchtower" - but not before Dylan spread his arms as if to behold the audience during a curtain call with the band - included another telling moment of his apparent newfound zest for performing. After he and the band worked through all of "All Along the Watchtower," Dylan sang the first stanza again as if he just wasn't ready to call it quits. It's very safe to say that, in this case, at least, neither was most of the audience. http://www.theledger.com/article/20101011/NEWS/10115019/1308/TIMEOUT?p=1&tc=pg

Voldar: Ещё бутлеги Боба. How Bob Dylan Sounded Before He Was a Star Enigmatic artists spawn their fair share of gossipy anecdotes, which is probably one reason why pop culture critics are so drawn to them. Bob Dylan is about as enigmatic—and chameleonic—as modern artists get, so I've had occasions of my own to chuckle over a few Dylan stories from time to time. My current favorite dovetails with the release this week of The Bootleg Series Volume 9—The Witmark Demos: 1962-1964. It's an unlikely scene: a very young Dylan sits in a Madison Avenue office room in 1962, cutting demos in the hopes that assorted folk-niks will be enticed to record his music, earning him royalty revenue in the off-chance that the whole performing career thing didn't work out. And why was that a concern? Dylan haters will love one possible answer: because of his voice. The story goes that the music arrangers in the surrounding offices had to ask that Mr. Dylan's door be pressed firmly shut, lest his braying vocals disrupt their work. find this absurd, and I don't doubt that you might as well, after you listen to these demonstration discs. We're met head-on by his voice in these demos. It's rugged, brittle, and churlish on "Masters Of War" and "The Death of Emmett Till." But that wispy, smoky voice of the seer—the one who will find a home on a future classic like Blonde On Blonde—wafts through the plangent, coarse soundscapes of "Mama, You've Been On My Mind" and "Don't Think Twice, It's All Right." The latter out-emotes the official studio version, and still retains the dignity of solid demo singing, creating the effect of a performer doing his damnedest to hold himself together, before excusing himself to go off and fall apart in private. There are also plenty of jokey asides, with Dylan commenting on his own wry songs, or the occasional production gaffe. But for every instance when Dylan cracks himself up with a lyric, there's a cut like "Girl From The North Country," delivered with the kind of epic solemnity prized by the great Delta bluesmen, but with a levity-inducing, spry sense of rhythm. The Dylan that inhabits these demos has a knack for sounding not of his time, or any time, really. You start to wonder just where the hell this man in a Madison Avenue office was coming from. The hardcore Dylan brigade has had most of these recordings for a long time, thanks to the bountiful Dylan bootleg business. Understandably, the overall demo concept is a bit at odds with our iPod age, so it may take listeners some time to grow into a release like this new two-disc set. Demos aren't intended, at any point, as a finished, releasable work. They're not alternate takes—that is, an attempt to get a part of a song or a complete song right. They're guides, a performance as instructional manual. There are some scattered Beatles examples, and a host of Pete Townshend Who demos, with Townshend playing all the instruments so his bandmates could later come along and learn their parts. And there are some Sex Pistols' demos with the lovely handle Spunk, which has an unfinished ring to me, like only one party got what they were looking for. Lively demos all the same. And that's notable, as demos are often more wooden than their official-version counterparts, with exaggerated enunciation and a prevailing formality that tends to be in contrast to their often lo-fi recording circumstances. I've often wondered what Dylan's fellow folkies would've thought when they heard some samples of his wares. Everything here was cut before Dylan turned 24. The man was positively armed with songs, and he was primed to use them. Dylan, as anyone who has seen Don't Look Back will attest, had no issues of conscience when it came to intimidating other artists. If you're ever feeling low because you've been shown up by someone, watch what happens to Donovan in that film when he's granted his request to play a song for Dylan, only to have Dylan reciprocate with one of his own. Some might see the Witmark demos as an admission that, maybe, a long-term performing career wasn't a certainty in Dylan's mind. Pop singers—remember, this is the era before rock and roll became rock, and got, like, out there, man—were expected to hew to traditional pop singer lines. Even folkie pop singers. If you couldn't, you wouldn't be unwise to have a back-up plan. Personally, I don't hear anything vaguely resembling a back-up plan here. I hear a guy with a different kind of talent finding another way to flaunt it. The music biz outsider, with the crazy voice, was, lo and behold, a music biz insider as well, the guy who delivered the publishing goods. And then, of course, there's the allure of someone having a hit record with one of your compositions, just so you can cut a version that surpasses it. Not that it ever came to that—but Dylan must have been grateful for the motivation in those shakier, pre-superstar times. http://www.theatlantic.com/culture/archive/2010/10/how-bob-dylan-sounded-before-he-was-a-star/64586/

Voldar: У Боба ещё один бокссет выходит. First look at Bob Dylan's 'Mono' CDs - Box set includes bonus MP3 Just received Bob Dylan - The Original Mono Recordings and The Best Of The Original Mono Recordings. First impressions: BOX SET: Bob Dylan - The Original Mono Recordings is packaged in a small box (5 3/4 " x 5 3/4 ") with two stickers: "LIMITED EDITION", and one that reads: "BOB DYLAN'S FIRST 8 ALBUMS REPRODUCED FROM THEIR FIRST GENERATION MIXES" --------------- DELUXE LP-REPLICA PACKAGING AND 60 PAGE FULL COLOR BOOK PLUS Free High Quality MP3 Download of the entire set, including exclusive bonus track, "Positively 4th Street," also in mono. Download valid through 12/31/2011 On the back of the box - all eight albums are listed with LP covers and include track listings. Front and back booklet covers consist of color photographs of Dylan circa 1966. Inside, there are many great, mostly familiar, portraits of the artist as a young man. Also included are an essay by Greil Marcus, track-by-track session information, and a list of album and single release dates from 1962 to 1967. Mini-LP sleeves are housed in a cut-away box featuring eight black and white photographs circa 1966. The Times They Are A-Changin' includes an insert with additional "Epitaphs". Blonde On Blonde gatefold, wth 2 CDs, does not restore the missing photographs from the original edition. The early albums include the timing strip on the back cover. Two inserts are included: One for the Witmark Demos, one for the "Free Digital Download". CDs have white "inner sleeves", except for Bob Dylan and Freewheelin', which replicate original inner sleeves of the era - Various other Columbia releases ("Stereo Spectacular", "Superb Listening", "Exotica", etc.) for Dylan's debut, the Columbia "eye logo" in the middle of vertical lines for the follow-up. Sticker for SINGLE CD: 14 SELECTIONS FROM THE ORIGINAL MONO RECORDINGS BOX SET 1962-1967 PUS BONUS MONO SINGLE "Positively 4th Street" The way these songs were meant to be heard - in one channel of powerful sound http://www.examiner.com/bob-dylan-in-national/dylan-cd-mono-box-set-included-mp3s-including-positively-4th-street

Voldar: Watch new Bob Dylan video for 'Guess I'm Doing Fine' here Sony has produced a video for the Bob Dylan track "Guess I'm Doing Fine", from The Witmark Demos 1962-1964: The Bootleg Series Vol. 9. The video, which features archival images from the early 1960s of Dylan as well as the era (Note the Hibbing baseball uniforms). Rolling Stone currently has the exclusive, but similar promotional videos officially make it to YouTube and other web sites soon after. This version unfortunately features the song with the ending cut off (at the time of this posting). You can watch the 2:43 video, which is embedded on the left. You may have to sit though an advertisement first. видео можно посмотреть здесь: http://www.examiner.com/bob-dylan-in-national/bob-dylan-guess-i-m-doing-fine-video

Voldar: Неутомимый Боб продолжает свой бесконечный тур. Bob Dylan set list - Ohio State University, November 4, 2010 Rainy Day Women # 12 & 35 Girl From The North Country Stuck Inside Of Mobile With The Memphis Blues Again Love Sick Summer Days Tangled Up In Blue Tweedle Dee & Tweedle Dum Tryin' To Get To Heaven High Water (for Charlie Patton) A Hard Rain's A-Gonna Fall Highway 61 Revisited Not Dark Yet Thunder On The Mountain Ballad Of A Thin Man // Jolene Like A Rolling Stone Rochester Institute of Technology, November 6, 2010 University of Pittsburgh, November 7, 2010 Ещё видео с The Whitmark Demos

Voldar: Из планов Боба на будущий год. Bob Dylan to play Bluesfest For years he refused to play in a town he had never heard of, but Bob Dylan has finally agreed to grace Byron Bay's Bluesfest with his folk-saintly presence. In a huge coup, the East Coast Blues and Roots Festival has confirmed an impressive trifecta of headline acts with influential English troubadour Elvis Costello and blues legend BB King joining Dylan over the Easter weekend. Bluesfest director Peter Noble has been chasing Dylan's signature since 2003 when the folk legend was booked to play but pulled out at the last minute. "Bob Dylan and BB King are rock royalty, and we especially wanted to get Dylan because of the counter culture and protest music in his early career representing a lot of what Byron Bay was once about," Noble said. "Byron used to be such an anti-establishment hippy town and to get Bob to play here has always been the Holy Grail. "He used to say, 'don't put me in any town I've never heard of', and finally we've done it, although I think he's heard of Byron now. "Elvis Costello is the icing on the cake of the best line-up we've had in years." While the three play their maiden shows in Byron Bay - King returns to Australia for the first time since 1995 - Bluesfest will welcome back some familiar faces including Michael Franti And Spearhead and Mexican duo Rodrigo Y Gabriela. Ben Harper will introduce his new supergroup Fistful Of Mercy, comprising also of Joseph Arthur and George Harrison's son Dhani as well as playing with his band du jour, the Relentless Seven. Another collaboration sees The Blind Boys Of Alabama paired with soul master Aaron Neville for the first time Down Under. Other international visitors will include Eric Bibb, Derek Trucks And Susan Tedeschi Band, Robert Randolph And The Family Band and Tony Joe White. From New Zealand the mighty Trinity Roots return newly reformed and bringing along their side project Little Bushmen, while local acts include The Cat Empire, Ash Grunwald, Washington, Xavier Rudd, Kate Miller-Heidke, CW Stoneking and Saltwater Band. Two more line-up announcements will be made in the coming months, but tickets are likely to move fast on Dylan's inclusion alone. http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2010/11/03/3056058.htm?section=justin

Voldar: Большая статья о том как сейчас проходят концерты Боба. Bob Dylan Examiner's UMass Lowell concert review - Part one Lowell, Massachusetts, has always had a special place in Dylan lore. 35 years ago, for the fourth Rolling Thunder Revue concert of 1975, Dylan and friends played Lowell's Technical University on November 2. The following day, Dylan and poet Allen Ginsberg were filmed visiting Jack Karouac's grave. A clip of this was included in the film Renaldo and Clara. A quarter of a century later, Dylan returned to Lowell to play the Paul E. Tsongas Arena on November 11, 2000. The venue opened about two years previous, but Dylan's appearance there led to more big name acts being booked, including Van Morrison the following spring. Last night, Dylan returned to Lowell - now known at the Tsongas Center - and gave an incendiary performance. I arrived early - about 6:20 - and got in line for the 8 p.m. show. We were let in at about 6:40. It was to be the 70th time I've seen Dylan on stage. Security made its presence known, but the entrance to the venue was hassle-free. I went to check out my seat - first row in section 117, just off the right side of the stage. At first it appeared that I had a great seat, but soon realized there was a problem. There was not only a speaker at the front right lip of the stage, but next to that was a spotlight. I was wondering if I could even see Dylan while he was at the keyboard. One reason I showed up early at the Center was to see if Dylan was still showing the film Intolerance before the show. While we didn't get that, we did get something even more special. Just to my right, Dylan's guitarist Stu Kimball was talking to some friends. The woman next to me tried to get Kimball to sign her poster, but he politely refused, saying it was "Bob's show". Then someone came up and asked if Stu's friends would like a photograph with "Mr. Kimball". Again, the guitarist refused, saying picture taking was not allowed. While this may sound rude in print, Kimball was quite disarming and probably just following orders. He even went over to the fan who asked for the signature and said he hoped she would enjoy the show. There was some confusion for certain concert goers who entered the building through the incorrect line, and did not get the necessary wristband to get onto the general admission section on the floor. There were also attendees who did not realize they would have to stand for more that two hours. At 8:08, the lights went down, and the announcer started the familiar introduction. Luckily I could just about see Dylan, from the back, while he was playing keyboards. Unfortunately, drummer George Recile and multi-instrumentalist Donnie Herron were blocked from view. The band was dressed mostly in beige, while Dylan was in black with a beige hat. They started with a swampy version of "Gonna Change My Way Of Thinking", energized by Charlie Sexton's slide guitar riffs and drummer George Recile's pounding rhythms. The first line out of Dylan's mouth sounded kind of rough, but it soon cleared up, and he sang clearly and passionately the rest of the evening. The vibe at the end of the song was reminiscent of the Rolling Stones' Exile On Main St. Sexton was clearly the visual focus of the show when Dylan was behind the keyboards. With his knee-bends, chops, and looks (a mix of David Bowie and Robbie Robertson circa 1973), he clearly energized Dylan, the band, and the crowd, without actually stealing Bob's thunder . Dylan then stepped up to center stage, armed with an electric guitar. "It Ain't Me, Babe" was next, which, coincidently was the second song Dylan played in 1975's Lowell gig. Dylan has been known to occasionally sleep walk through this classic from his fourth album. Tonight, however, he not only connected with the original emotions of the song, but clearly had been rehearsing some rather complicated melodic guitar solos, often based on chord structures. The early solos were most successful, while the later ones were more of the simple one-note-at-a-time variety, and not always the correct one. Still, Dylan's charisma made watching him play guitar mandatory. I wondered if Sexton was giving Dylan guitar lessons while on the road? Kimball started strumming his acoustic guitar and it was clear that "Memphis Blues Again" was next. The first of many photographic images appeared behind the stage, projected onto the back curtain. It appeared to be a building with a structure similar to the Eiffel Tower, but was obviously something else (Mobile ? Memphis?). Dylan played lead guitar again, and his voice was completely clear by this point (at least by 2010 standards). Toward the end, Dylan was playing Chuck Berry-style riffs. To be continued . . .

Voldar: Кто то немножко пошутил над Бобом,почти на 4000$. Pizza parlor stiffed by fake Dylan rep AMHERST, Mass. (WWLP) - A pizza prank cost an Amherst business a lot of money and aggravation and resulted in Antonio's Pizza throwing away dozens of pies. Early Saturday morning, a man walked into Antonio's Pizzeria in Amherst and ordered 148 pizzas... an order that cost nearly $4,000. He claimed he was with Bob Dylan's crew and was wearing a backstage pass which didn't seem crazy because Bob Dylan had played the Mullins Center in Amherst on Friday night. He promised a big tip and said he would return in several hours to deliver them to Dylan's crew. Sean McElligott, the manager of Antonio's, told 22News the man looked like he was in his 40s or 50s. He and his staff were excited about the opportunity so they stayed late to make the pizzas however the customer never returned and never paid. He said they were forced to give away half of the pizzas to family, friends, and local businesses. The other half had to be thrown away. “It was a tremendous waste of time, money, food, and effort. Our people were here very late. People who had worked a full shift had to work an extra four hours and got out at about 6 in the morning,” said McElligott. Owner Walter Pacheco told 22News he wishes his staff got a deposit from the man or his phone number before they made the pizzas. Right now, they are analyzing a security video to try and find the person who pulled this prank. http://www.foxtoledo.com/dpps/news/offbeat/mass-pizza-parlor-stiffed-by-fake-dylan-rep-ob10-jgr_3656817

Voldar: Бесконечный тур Боба в этом году всё таки закончился. Bob Dylan set list - Foxwoods, November 27, 2010 Bob Dylan ended his fall tour last night in Mashantucket, Connecticut Mashantucket, Connecticut MGM Grand Theater at Foxwoods November 27, 2010 1. Gonna Change My Way Of Thinking (Bob on keyboard, Donnie on lap steel) 2. Lay, Lady, Lay (Bob center stage on harp, Donnie on pedal steel, Stu on acoustic guitar) 3. I'll Be Your Baby Tonight (Bob on guitar, Donnie on pedal steel, Stu on acoustic guitar) 4. Tangled Up In Blue (Bob center stage on harp, Donnie on pedal steel, Stu on acoustic guitar) 5. Tweedle Dee & Tweedle Dum (Bob on guitar, Donnie on pedal steel) 6. The Lonesome Death Of Hattie Carroll (Bob on keyboard, Donnie on electric mandolin, Stu on acoustic guitar, Tony on standup bass) 7. High Water (For Charley Patton) (Bob center stage on harp, Donnie on banjo, Stu on acoustic guitar, Tony on standup bass) 8. Visions Of Johanna (Bob on keyboard, Donnie on electric mandolin, Stu on acoustic guitar) 9. Summer Days (Bob on keyboard, Donnie on pedal steel, Tony on standup bass) 10. Love Sick (Bob on keyboard, Donnie on electric mandolin) 11. Highway 61 Revisited (Bob on keyboard, Donnie on lap steel, Stu on acoustic guitar) 12. Workingman's Blues #2 (Bob on keyboard then center stage on harp, Donnie on pedal steel, Stu on acoustic guitar) 13. Thunder On The Mountain (Bob on keyboard, Donnie on lap steel, Stu on acoustic guitar) 14. Ballad Of A Thin Man (Bob center stage on harp, Donnie on lap steel) (encore) 15. Jolene (Bob on keyboard, Donnie on lap steel, Tony on standup bass) 16. Like A Rolling Stone (Bob on keyboard, Donnie on pedal steel) http://www.examiner.com/bob-dylan-in-national/bob-dylan-set-list-foxwoods-november-27-2010-plus-list-of-fall-tour-songs

Voldar: На экзаминере загадали загадку - кто этот чувак на видео? Did Bob Dylan wear a disguise to watch the Band on SNL in 1976 ? About four weeks before The Last Waltz, The Band appeared on the second season of NBC's Saturday Night Live program. Buck Henry was the host. According to the embedded clip (left), found by Bob Dylan's friend Larry "Ratso" Sloman, there is a close-up of someone in the audience, identified as an "Electoral College Dropout." It's my understanding that if there is a closeup of an audience member, special permission must be obtained. This would explain why these "close-ups" usually featured the same staff members over and over again. Has this been kept a secret for over three decades? Here's the blurb: On October 30, 1976, The Band appeared as the musical guest on a weekly late night sketch-based comedy show. About 14 minutes into the episode, a man who looked a lot like Bob Dylan wearing a costume (and possibly prosthetics) was briefly featured in the audience. Could this have actually been Bob Dylan wearing a fake nose, hippie wig, and weird clothing? What do you think? Is it Dylan? Is it Sloman?

Voldar: Рукопись Боба Дилана выставлена на аукцион за $250 000 Выцветший, нечистый и покусанный собакой кусочек бумаги не так часто оценивают в четверть миллиона долларов. Причина, впрочем, ясна – именно на этой бумажке 47 лет назад Боб Дилан впервые записал текст песни The Times They Are A-Changin. Вошедшая позже в одноименный альбом Дилана, песня стала гимном протестного движения в США и Европе. Сегодня она известна в десятках кавер-версий, причем такие суперзвезды 60-х, как The Beach Boys, The Byrds и Саймон и Гарфанкель записали свои версии в первые же два года после появления песни. Позже к ним присоединились Нина Симон (1969), Билли Джоэл (1987), Фил Коллинз (1996), Брайан Ферри (2007) и Херби Хенкок (2010), не упоминая уже менее известных исполнителей. Лист с текстом был выставлен на продажу другом Дилана Колином Крауном, с которым они общались с начала 60-х, когда Боб давал свои первые концерты в богемных клубах Нью-Йорка. Эксперты аукционного дома Sotbey полагают, что рукопись будет продана на $250 000 - $300 000. Впрочем, когда дело касается легендарных рок-песен, реальность часто превосходит ожидания аукционистов. Так, рукопись текста песни The Beatles A Day in the Life, которая, как ожидалось, будет продана за $500 000 - $800 000, в итоге была оценена в $1 200 000. http://ivona.bigmir.net/showbiz/stars/302382

Voldar: Ещё три диска Боба этого года,просто обалдеть. 3 CD set 'The Bob Dylan Sampler' The Bob Dylan Sampler hails from 2010 and is a U.S. 3CD mega-rare promotional music licensing sampler housed in a deluxe tri-fold glossy picture sleeve. This 36-track sampler features custom printed discs with each disc’s tracks selected to support ‘The Hits’, ”Best of The Bootleg Series’ and 'Forgotten Gems’. An absolutely amazing collectible!! Note: "Abandoned Love" , "I Wanna Be Your Lover", and "Up To Me" were on Biograph, not The Bootleg Series. Tracks are as follow: The Hits The Times They are A-Changin’ Blowin’ in the Wind Like a Rolling Stone Rainy Day Women #12 & 35 All Along the Watchtower Knockin’ on Heaven’s Door Tangled up in Blue Subterranean Homesick Blues Mr. Tambourine Man Lay, Lady, Lay Forever Young Gotta Serve Somebody Best of The Bootleg Series Series of Dreams I Was Young When I Left Home Mama, You Been on my Mind Abandoned Love Blind Willie McTell Mississippi I Wanna Be Your Lover I’ll Keep it with Mine Born in Time Farewell Angelina Up to Me Paths of Victory Forgotten Gems Ring Them Bells Dignity Not Dark Yet Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window? It’s All Over Now, Baby Blue Most Likely You Go Your Way (And I'll Go Mine) If Not For You Simple Twist of Fate The Groom's Still Waiting at the Altar Tryin' to Get to Heaven High Water (for Charlie Patton) When the Deal Goes Down В следующем году Боб собирается в австралию уже весной. http://www.examiner.com/bob-dylan-in-national/rare-promo-3-cd-set-the-bob-dylan-sampler

Voldar: Статья в Wall Street Journal,которая вызвала большой резонанс не только среди поклонников Боба.Основная мысль статьи - а не пора ли старичкам на покой? When to Leave the Stage A generation of music icons is hitting retirement age, along with their baby-boomer fans. Is it time for Bob Dylan to hang up his hat and harmonica? Last Friday night, Bob Dylan chugged through "Highway 61 Revisited" at the Borgata, an Atlantic City, N.J., casino. His always-raspy voice, now deteriorated to a laryngitic croak, echoed through the no-frills ballroom. Security guards wandered the seated audience, enforcing his no-cameras policy. Behind some empty rows in the rear, a handful of dancers shimmied mildly. A trickle of people peeled off for the exit, descending an escalator into the ringing rows of slot machines. One of the walkouts, 50-year-old Warner Christy, said he wouldn't be paying to see the singer again: "I've been scared straight." For people of influence in any walk of life, from corporate leaders to sports stars, the question of when to leave the stage is a crucial one. Do you go out at the top of your game, giving up any shot at further glory? Or do you dig in until the end, at the risk of tarnishing a distinguished career? For the many and passionate fans of Bob Dylan these are questions that loom large. After 50 years in music, his place in the pantheon is unassailable. He is the age's iconic singer-songwriter and rock's poet laureate—a title even he lays claim to in the introduction read aloud before his concerts. And unlike other artists of the '60s who've been trading on nostalgia since the '70s, he has continued to release new material and wrestle with his art form. Such are the consolations for fans who have seen one of music's best talents at his worst. The issue of whether Mr. Dylan should pack it in has been an enduring parlor game in music circles, whether part of the punk generation's attack on hippie dinosaurs, or the dismay of those hippie dinosaurs over their hero's notoriously dismal output in the '80s. Now, however, Mr. Dylan's detractors question whether he—at age 69 and having just wrapped yet another tour—is capable of another turnaround. Most alarming to listeners devoted to his seminal recordings: the state of Mr. Dylan's voice, decades on from its first signs of deterioration. Dr. Lee Akst, director of the Johns Hopkins Voice Center, says it's impossible to diagnose Mr. Dylan without an examination, but that rock singers are especially prone to scarring or other damage to the vocal cords. Such trauma can be cumulative, he says, compounding the risks for the perennially touring singer. What's obvious: Though he never had a conventionally pretty voice—that was part of its power—lately he's been sounding like a scatting Cookie Monster. On stage, he strums an electric guitar and blows on a harmonica but spends more time at an upright organ, vamping. Representatives for Mr. Dylan said he was unavailable for comment. Retirement is an alien concept among music stars who know only a life of performing and touring. Those who have decided to give it up early have often changed their minds. Saying it was time to "move aside," Little Richard announced his retirement at age 70—eight years ago. Since then, he has played about 100 gigs. At age 33, rapper Jay-Z said he was hanging up his microphone to concentrate on being a music executive. Three albums later, he vows to never make such a pronouncement again, recently saying, "I lost the privilege to even discuss the topic, I did it so bad." At the zenith of his Ziggy Stardust fame, David Bowie announced his last concert from the stage, only to reinvent himself with impressive results. Yet he has not publicly performed since 2007, and perhaps won't ever again—he hasn't said. This issue is coming to the fore now that a generation of performers is hitting old age, along with their baby-boomer fans. Not unlike their R&B predecessors, such as the still-touring Four Tops, most classic rock acts are delivering note-for-note nostalgia, but on a bigger scale. Pink Floyd's Roger Waters scored one of the most successful tours of the year by rolling out "The Wall," updating only the 1980 stage technology. But for the handful of acts releasing new material and trying to stay relevant as artists, there's no late-career blueprint. Mr. Dylan isn't working toward a golden parachute; he's pursuing a craft. "Anybody with a trade can work as long as they want. A welder, a carpenter, an electrician. They don't necessarily need to retire," he said in an interview published in Rolling Stone last year. "My music wasn't made to take me one place to another so I can retire early." After all, he cut himself from the same cloth as artists such as Woody Guthrie and Leadbelly, for whom performing was a matter of existential, if not economic, necessity. He has sold almost 21 million albums since 1991, when Nielsen SoundScan began tracking such figures. In the past decade, he has moved more than 3.7 million concert tickets and grossed more than $192 million on tour, according to Pollstar. If he walks away from touring, he has fallbacks, including painting (the National Gallery of Denmark is exhibiting 40 of his works) and writing (the first volume of his "Chronicles" memoirs was a hit; two more installments are expected.) Why single out Mr. Dylan when Judy Collins and other graying veterans are out there touring unmolested? Firing the debate is his status as the ultimate music icon, the caretaker of a body of work that, many would agree, stands in contrast to his current sound. He's also got a touring schedule that would put some hungry young acts to shame. He's been doing roughly 100 gigs, year in, year out, since 1988. While some oldies acts play obscure venues because no one else will have them, Mr. Dylan seems bent on playing every last stage in America, including minor-league baseball parks, college campuses and antiquated theaters such as the Shrine Mosque in Springfield, Mo. Casual fans, especially, are vexed by Mr. Dylan's ongoing habit of mutating his most familiar songs. In Atlantic City he shadowboxed with the beat on "Just Like a Woman," going silent when the crowd gamely sang the chorus, then rushing out the words himself. To his many loyal admirers, such idiosyncrasies just emphasize his artistry. "With every concert, he's saying, 'Think again,' " says historian Sean Wilentz, author of the recent book "Dylan in America." Jim Waniak is having none of that. Though he's seen eight previous Dylan concerts, he, too, walked out on him at the Borgata, saying, "I know every word to 'Desolation Row' but I couldn't sing along. What you're used to feeling from his music just isn't there." Mr. Dylan's critics say they're simply evaluating him as he is now, without spotting him any points for past achievements. Last July, music critic Ian Gittins watched Mr. Dylan headline a music festival in Kent, England, where he followed strong performances, including one by folk newcomers Mumford & Sons. At first, Mr. Gittins jostled for a view at the rear of the predominately young crowd. But before the singer even got to his frequent closer, "Like a Rolling Stone," the critic had elbow room to spare. "The crowd had melted away," retreating from "the perplexing noise of this man whining," Mr. Gittins, 48 years old, said in an interview. Of course, the singer has been derailing expectations, riling the faithful and inspiring calls for his head since he strapped on an electric guitar at the Newport Folk Festival in 1965. He made many of his critics reconsider in 1997, when he released "Time Out of Mind," a mordant, Grammy-winning album that established a new artistic benchmark for him. But if he plows on indefinitely, could the accumulating career lows undermine the highs? "Listen, this legacy stuff is a bunch of crap," says University of Chicago economics professor David Galenson. "That goes for Michael Jordan and Bob Dylan and economic professors: You're known for your best work, not the bad work at the end of your career." Mr. Galenson examined the two potential "life cycles" of creativity among great artists in his book "Old Masters and Young Geniuses." Epitomizing the latter, Mr. Dylan worked conceptually and with deliberation, turning out his most influential work before he hit 30. So what becomes of young geniuses in their dotage? Mr. Galenson judges their "graciousness" by whether they accept that their greatest work is behind them. He points to interviews in which Mr. Dylan discusses searing songs such as "Blowin' in the Wind" with a sort of detached awe. "I give him credit for saying, 'I love those old songs but I couldn't write them anymore if I tried.' My suspicion is that very few artists of any kind would admit that," he says. Mr. Dylan has defied the young-genius playbook simply by continuing to roam the earth, unlike Jimi Hendrix and Janis Joplin. The result: the somewhat disconcerting spectacle of a rock star acting his age. Mortality has been an undercurrent in his recent music. The song "Forgetful Heart" on last year's "Together Through Life" album features the closing line "The door has closed forevermore, if indeed there ever was a door." Mr. Wilentz says we're witnessing an unvarnished evolution, pointing out that Mr. Dylan hasn't made obvious fixes with cosmetic surgery, and favors "old man's clothes." With flat wide-brimmed hats and dark suits with piping on his pant legs, "he looks like a cross between a parson and a Mississippi riverboat gambler. It's stagey, but it's certainly sedate." Pop critic Jim DeRogatis says Mr. Dylan's methods—changing the set list nightly, reshaping songs on the fly—are nobler even in defeat than the crowd-pleasing approach by the Rolling Stones. The Stones have poured money into production on stadium outings, such as the "Bigger Bang" tour in 2006 (featuring tiered balconies on stage for high-end ticket buyers) and delivered faithful renditions from their catalog, from "Start Me Up" to "Brown Sugar." "They're like a global corporation and they cannot let down their stockholders and employees," Mr. DeRogatis says. Still, Mr. Dylan's live shows are a no-go for the critic ("I've been burned too many times") now that they're not compulsory—Mr. DeRogatis left the Chicago Sun-Times last year. Stalwarts revel in the promise of resurgence. Two weeks ago, Kenny Goldsmith took his 12-year-old son to his first Bob Dylan concert, at the Mid-Hudson Civic Center, a hockey-rink facility in Poughkeepsie, N.Y. They both left disappointed. Reading the show's set list online the next day, he was surprised to see "Just Like Tom Thumb's Blues"—he hadn't even recognized the lyrics coming out of Mr. Dylan's mouth. Last week Mr. Goldsmith was in the audience again, this time at Terminal 5, a club frequented by indie rock bands on their way up. The venue was crowded and hot, the sound was clear, and Mr. Dylan seemed fired up for a three-night stand in Manhattan. Occasionally he bared his teeth in either a grimace or a grin. As Mr. Dylan plowed through the climax of "Tom Thumb's Blues," singing, "I do believe I've had enough," a smiling Mr. Goldsmith turned to a friend and shouted, "Compared to last time? 180 degrees!" By JOHN JURGENSEN http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704594804575648691223353352.html?KEYWORDS=bob+dylan



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