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Voldar: , , "" . Joni Mitchell: Everything about Bob Dylan is fake Mitchell, 66, attacked her fellow folk musician after an interviewer for the Los Angeles Times casually noted that both had changed their names, in Dylan's case from Bobby Zimmerman. "Bob is not authentic at all. He's a plagiarist, and his name and voice are fake," she said, not appreciating the comparison. Everything about Bob is a deception. We are like night and day, he and I." Her plagiarism accusation may be linked to a controversy in 2006 over Dylan's album Modern Times. Critics claimed his lyrics borrowed too heavily from the writing of the Confederacy poet Henry Timrod. Dylan, an American Civil War buff, made no acknowledgement to Timrod in the album's sleeve notes. He was also accused of borrowing the words of other writers in previous album lyrics, including a dozen passages allegedly lifted from a gangster novel written by an obscure Japanese writer. In her interview, Mitchell also attacked her contemporaries Grace Slick and Janis Joplin, claiming both in their heyday were "[sleeping with] their whole bands and falling down drunk". She criticised Madonna's cultural influence, saying: "Americans have decided to be stupid and shallow since 1980. Madonna is like Nero; she marks the turning point." Mitchell did, at least, have something good to say about Jimi Hendrix, who she described as "the sweetest guy". http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/music/bob-dylan/7625304/Joni-Mitchell-Everything-about-Bob-Dylan-is-fake.html

Voldar: - . : October release for 'Bob Dylan by Greil Marcus, Writings 1968-2010' Greil Marcus has been reviewing, researching, and analyzing the music of Bob Dylan since the late 1960s. The first four words of his 1970 Rolling Stone review of Dylan's Self Portrait have become the stuff of legend - "What is this s*&@?". It led to his departure from the magazine for five years. In 1975, he wrote the liner notes for Dylan and The Band's Basement Tapes double album. His book, Invisible Republic, later reissued under the original title The Old Weird America , delved into the roots of these recordings, which led to the re-release of Harry Smith's Anthology of Folk Music. Marcus is currently working on a compilation of his articles and reviews about Bob Dylan. The following is from the introduction of a new interview published by PopMatters: Its been a busy time for Marcus. . .This fall, PublicAffairs will release Bob Dylan by Greil Marcus, Writings 1968-2010, which Marcus describes as a collection of nearly everything Ive written on Dylan outside of Invisible Republic/The Old Weird America and Like a Rolling Stone. Its long. I dont know how long; Im still working on it." here's some additional information from the PublicAffairs website: HARDCOVER ISBN 978-1586488314 Pub date: 10/26/10 Price: $27.95/33.95 Canada 6 1/8 x 9 1/4 400 pages Marcus first became aware of Dylan in 1963, after seeing him guest at a Joan Baez concert in New Jersey. He tells this humorous story of purchasing The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan soon after: Who knew that the cover of that albumtwo young people facing the world from a snowy city streetwould sound down through the years with as much force as its songs would? Certainly not me; I couldnt figure out why the songs on my record didnt match the ones listed on the jacket. There was even one with a band. This has the wrong songs on it, I told the record store owner. I want a good copy. Ill have some in next week, he said. But I never went back. It is unclear if that means he just had a rare album cover, or the much sought-after early version of Freewheelin', which is one of the most valuable records ever made. ------ Greil Marcus has been out promoting his new book, When That Rough God Goes Riding: Listening to Van Morrison (PublicAffairs). In the PopMatters interview, there is a discussion of the inevitable comparisons between Morrison and Dylan. Marcus also has this interesting take on Dylan's stories in Chronicles, Volume One: Well, I loved the book. I wrote about it at one point and decided to check on some of things he said. He talked about his mother seeing Woodrow Wilson during a whistle-stop campaign in 1912, and it became pretty clear with a little research that it couldnt have happened, that Wilson just wasnt there at the time. But that doesnt mean that wasnt a story told in her family . . . Some people jumped on the part of the book where hes living with these people who have this incredible library, and hes discovering all these books, and people say, Well, that has to be a composite. I dont care. http://www.examiner.com/x-21829-Bob-Dylan-Examiner~y2010m4d25-Autumn-release-for-Bob-Dylan-by-Greil-Marcus-Writings-19682010 : http://www.publicaffairsbooks.com/publicaffairsbooks-cgi-bin/display?book=9781586488314

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Voldar: The 35th Anniversary of Bob Dylans Blood on the Tracks Blood on the Tracks: Place and Displacement By Richard Elliott 28 April 2010 Of the many wonderful moments to be found in No Direction Home, Martin Scorseses film about Bob Dylan, one seems to come closest to revealing what has made Dylan such an enduringly fascinating artist to follow over the many decades of his career. Following footage of Dylan performing Mr Tambourine Manone of his most wandering songs, with its instruction to take me disappearing and its desire to forget about today until tomorrowwe cut to Dylan making the following claim: An artist has got to be careful never really to arrive at a place where he thinks hes at somewhere. You always have to realize that youre constantly in a state of becoming. This fine bit of editing by Scorsese highlights a constant aspect of Dylans varied career and repertoire, namely a tug-of-war, or dialectic, between place and displacement, also played out as a negotiation between movement and stasis, travel and home, present and past. Dylan presents himselfconvincingly, for the most partas an artist more interested in becoming than being and he continually stresses, in his life and art, a desire to move on to another place, to be somewhere where all those people looking for him (the real him) will not think to look. But this doesnt ever do away with the constant haunting presence of home, stasis, and the past in his work. He is an artist who, no matter what he may say, really does look back. Dylans work has always been characterized by a poetics of place and displacement. The poetics of place establishes itself through recourse to repeated mentions of real and imagined places, which seem to fix many of Dylans texts in recognizable locations and which are therefore crucial to the ability of his audience to identify with the texts. These locationswhether actual or metaphoricalare fixed moments that the memory can focus on even as it struggles to recall other features. The poetics of displacement, meanwhile, seeks to challenge and destabilize any sense of permanence even as it simultaneously relies on a set of temporary memory sites. Dylans displacement techniques and refusal of a fixed identity constantly unpick the knowable, but cannot escape the desire for stabilizing moments. The importance of home and displacement in Dylans work is clearly understood by the makers of the three best films about Dylan: D.A. Pennebakers Dont Look Back, Scorseses No Direction Home, and Todd Hayness Im Not There. All three films take their titles from lines in Dylans songs and acknowledge the impossibility of capturing their subject even as they attempt to do so. No Direction Home opens with Dylan speaking the following words: I had ambitions to set out and find like an odyssey, going home somewhere. I set out to find this home that Id left a while back and I couldnt remember exactly where it was but I was on my way there, and encountering what I encountered on the way was how I envisioned it all. I didnt really have any ambition at all ... I was born very far from where Im supposed to be and so Im on my way home. This typically Dylan-esque logic exposes the bewilderment at the heart of the dialectic of place and displacement. Home, it seems, is as much where youre going as where youve been; youll know it when you see it, but your recognition, by definition, will consist of something you already knew. These qualities of remembered bewilderment and bewildered memory run like threads through Dylans career, arguably finding their most telling manifestation on Blood on the Tracks, an album full of longings, imaginings, and memories, peopled by an ever-shifting but ever-interlocking (tangled) cast of characters. In Blood on the Tracks we meet our unreliable narrator heading out for the East Coast in the opening song; over the course of seven verses, we drift through New Orleans and Delacroix, settling briefly in a basement on Montague Street, only to end up where we started, Still on the road / Headin for another joint. The only thing I knew how to do, sings Dylan through his alias, Was to keep on keepin on like a bird that flew. Speaking in 1978, Dylan proffered the opinion that Blood on the Tracks differed from his earlier work in that theres a code in the lyrics and also theres no sense of time. Theres no respect for it: youve got yesterday, today, and tomorrow all in the same room, and theres very little that you cant imagine not happening. To shift the temporal and spatial axes of this observation, we could also say that here, there, and everywhere are taking place at the same time. Tangled up in Blue sets the tone by roaming across time and place, suggesting that any attempt to sort the tangle of memories the singer finds himself afflicted by can only ever be provisional and temporary. The lack of fixity is emphasized by the changing personal pronouns of the verses and the tendency for Dylan to rewrite the lyrics in subsequent performances. The personal pronouns shift again in the second track of the album, Simple Twist of Fate, as the protagonist changes from he to I. The anguished cry of Ive never gotten used to it in If You See Her, Say Hello stresses involuntary memory (the name he cant get used to hearing acts like Prousts petite madeleine), while I replay the past focuses on the voluntary memory work that inevitably follows. The unexpected flash of the past summons a desire to take control of ones history in the hope of taming the power and danger of such flashbacks. Shelter from the Storm imagines a place where its always safe and warm, an appeal to the homely that contrasts with the displacement enacted elsewhere. Buckets of Rain, the cozy blues that closes the album, suggests the singer may have found his shelter. The dialectic of place and displacement is also to be found in Dylans famous wild mercury sound, that magic sonority he sensed while at his 1960s peak and which he rediscovered magnificently on Blood on the Tracks. Its entirely possible for both performer and audience to lose their place in this music. From the performers side, this can be witnessed by the number of live recordings in which Dylan loses his way in the lyrics; he also, it should be pointed out, battles his way out of lyrical dilemmas triumphantly and creatively, as can be heard on the alternate recordings of those Blood on the Tracks songs that were released on the first official Bootleg Series. This disorientation should be seen as part of the code Dylan speaks of, an invitation to engage in a ritualistic setting-aside of everyday time, space, and logic. This is something Paul Williams drew attention to in his discussion of the album in the second volume of Bob Dylan: Performing Artist. Williams also highlighted the way that the rhythmic thrust of the songs on Blood on the Tracks drives the listener on. Something compels us to follow Dylan into his labyrinth of words and sounds, even at the risk of losing our way. Theme and form support each other as Dylan delivers his sweeping narratives over washes of organ, driving guitar, and insistent drumming. There is pleasure in the way Dylan displaces us, handing us the magical constructs of his peculiarly stressed verses to ponder over as he moves on and away from us, leaving blood on the tracks. Nowhere is this more extravagantly achieved than on Idiot Wind, with its spellbinding structure. As Williams wrote of the song, Dylan more than ever shows himself master of juxtapositions, connections, quick dissolves and timeless freeze frames. These juxtapositions provide a sense of place as much as displacement. These are popular songs, after all, and popular songs love to come home. Dylans refrains bring it all back home and provide a round trip that is part of the geographical quality to his songs. Blues structures suggest their resolutions right from the start, while folk ballads circle infinitely around refrains. Dylans phrasing also brings a sense of stability even as he is displacing linguistic commonplaces; witness the role of idiot in Idiot Wind, or the refrains of Tangled Up in Blue and Shelter from the Storm. Home is the pull here and, for all the moving on that needs to be done, there is always a temptation to turn around and look behind. Displacement derives its power from the pull of place, after all. How much of Bob Dylan should we read into these songs? Dylans response to his fame and to the expectations that come with it is as prone to displacement as his songwriting. Again, refusal seems to be the defining strategy: distancing himself from the folk music scene he helped to define, distancing himself from the role of visionary and from any particular political stance, distancing himself from his own work and legacy through a constant reinterpretation of his songs. Like his character Alias in Sam Peckinpahs Pat Garrett & Billy the Kid, Bob Dylan is always somewhere and someone else. What is said of the relationship explored in Tangled Up in Blue might also be said of the relationship between the various Dylans we have been offered down the years: We always did feel the same / We just saw it from a different point of view. Richard Elliott is a writer, university teacher, and journal editor based in Newcastle upon Tyne. He is the author of the book Fado and the Place of Longing: Loss, Memory and the City (2010), as well as articles and reviews covering a wide variety of popular music genres. Richard is currently working on a co-authored book on ritual, remembrance, and recorded sound. http://www.popmatters.com/pm/feature/124623-blood-on-the-tracks-place-and-displacement

Voldar: . Sunday Morning Coming Down: Bob Dylan, "Love and Theft" There are albums that are embedded with a weekend mood. Whether its Saturday afternoon or Sunday morning, Bob Dylans Love and Theft just has that feel. Its a backyard hammock kind of album. Its a chill-out record for a sunny day. A front porch and a screen door should have been included with every copy. Thats because listening to Love and Theft, you feel like youre sitting in a rocking chair next to Uncle Bob, dressed up like Mark Twain, wearing a ridiculous moustache, and gazing out at the hazy day. He tells stories. He cracks wise. He reminisces about the good times. He mutters about the bad. He tells a knock-knock joke. Following the expansive, sometimes sinister, sounds of his 1997 Grammy-winning comeback album, Time Out of Mind, Dylan circles back to an era that predates his earliest recorded material. Love and Theft is stocked with folk, blues, jazz and pop tunes straight out of the early 20th century. He plants both feet not just in the past, but in this mythic, gothic, kudzu-covered southern past with words by Tennessee Williams and music by Charley Patton. Its no shock that Dylan, an invented character himself, seems perfectly happy in this semi-fictional place. In fact, hes never sounded more at home. Theres a comfort built into songs like Mississippi, a steady-rolling country tune that was kicking around for so long, Sheryl Crow recorded and released her cover version three years before Dylans own take. Where it sounds like Crow is pushing the song over hills and valleys, Dylan simply lounges on a raft as it rolls down the Big Muddy. My heart is not weary / its light and its free, Dylan proclaims. Ive got nothing but affection for all those whove sailed with me. Listening to Love and Theft is like watching a really good actor. You go, Wheres the work? Its all so effortless. Maybe that would seem like a lesser accomplishment if every song was whittled out of mid-tempo country-folk. But no, Dylan tries some swinging pop (Summer Days), croaks some bullfrog blues (Lonesome Day Blues) and does some craggy crooning on a jazzy love song (Moonlight). Dylan deserves credit for his versatility, for sure, but his backing band needs its due, too. Each track sounds like a slightly different band a compliment to the multi-tasking greatness of these players. It was no accident. By the time Love and Theft was released in 2001, David Kemper and Tony Garnier already had five years experience serving as Dylans rhythm section. They were plenty skilled at beating a retreat for Bob, no matter where he wanted to go. But the true supporting stars here are guitarists Charlie Sexton and Larry Campbell. Now, Dylans played with some fabulous sidemen Mike Bloomfield, Robbie Robertson, T-Bone Burnett, Mike Campbell but his turn-of-the-century team is as good as any hes had. While Bob is up there toying with clichés and speaking in antiquated tongues, its Sexton and Campbell who are conjuring misty jazz licks, twiddling banjos and crunching down hard on the blues. Then theres Honest With Me, which comes barreling in two-thirds of the way into the album only to have Sexton and Campbell burn down the whole juke joint. One guys on the left, chopping up kindling with his razor riffs while the other is on the right, fanning the flames with his blazing dips and dives. Meanwhile, Dylan stands in the center ring of fire, declaring, Im here to create the new imperial empire / Im gonna do whatever circumstances require. Its positively incendiary. And if that sounds like a bit much for your Sunday morning, then skip ahead to the foggy, perfectly-phrased album-closer Sugar Baby, or skip back to High Water (For Charley Patton). Revel in Dylans banjo-spiked tale of the hard times and strife of the blues community, but also the amazing legacy that runs parallel to the horror. Of course, Bob lifts a few lyrics from blues classics to drive home his point of view. Its rough out there, he grumbles. Well, then, its even better that youre here, with your porch and your screen door and Love and Theft on the stereo. Conditions are perfect. Bob Dylan, Love and Theft (2001) 1. Tweedle Dee & Tweedle Dum 2. Mississippi 3. Summer Days 4. Bye and Bye 5. Lonesome Day Blues 6. Floater (Too Much to Ask) 7. High Water (For Charley Patton) 8. Moonlight 9. Honest With Me 10. Po Boy 11. Cry a While 12. Sugar Baby Bob Dylan, Lonesome Day Blues May 2002 in Brighton, U.K. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IBwrrBEGd0g

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Voldar: Clinton Heylin . Revolution In The Air. Still On The Road successfully scrutinises Bob Dylan's creative process Dylanophile Clinton Heylin picks up the story (in this follow-up to Revolution In The Air) in 1974, with the singer/songwriter on the verge of hitting a creative high point with Blood On The Tracks. He again pulls off the labyrinthine task of charting Dylans career path through his songs; a task that becomes increasingly difficult as the artist flits from producer to producer and the line between what constitutes a finished song and a studio outtake becomes almost impossible to draw. And this time the fertile periods, which coalesced on great albums such as Desire and Slow Train Coming, are interspersed with bouts of writers block one lasting five years but ending with the triumphant return to form of Time Out Of Mind and increased touring rather than recording. The degree of knowledge Heylin assumes of his readers runs the risk of excluding all but the most avid Dylanoraks from fully appreciating this work but rarely does an author put an artists creative process under such scrutiny and stitch his findings together with such success. http://www.metro.co.uk/metrolife/books/825701-still-on-the-road-successfully-scrutinises-bob-dylans-creative-process

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Voldar: . Bob Dylan's 'Last Waltz' jacket is priced £4,000 The jacket worn by the rock 'n' legend in Martin Scorsese's documentary is auctioning in the UK A number of exceptional film, television and music props are adding glamour to saleroom at Cameo Fine Art Auctioneers on May 23. Among the starring lots is a leather jacket from 1978, owned by none other than the folk and rock 'n' roll legend Bob Dylan himself. Labelled Jackson The Tailor, the jacket was worn by Dylan in director Martin Scorsese's 1978 film The Last Waltz, documenting the final concert of Dylan's sometime backing group, The Band. According to Cameo, the jacket was donated by Dylan to the Woodstock Cooperative and comes with a signed letter of authenticity from former The Band member Rick Danko, from 1994. The jacket is estimated at £3,000-4,000. Footage of Dylan performing in the jacket can be seen in the below cinematic trailer for The Last Waltz - watch closely and he crops up a various times during the clip. Cameo's auction will take place in Reading, Berkshire, UK.

Voldar: Tom Jones covering Bob Dylan, John Lee Hooker on new album Tom Jones om Jones has announced that he will release a new album of cover versions, 'Praise And Blame', on July 26. The album was produced by Ethan Johns (Kings Of Leon, Rufus Wainwright, Laura Marling), and features covers of songs by artists such as Bob Dylan, John Lee Hooker and Billy Joe Shaver. The release will be preceded by a double A-side seven-inch vinyl single, 'Burning Hell'/'What Good Am I', originally by Hooker and Dylan respectively, on June 7. Watch video footage of Jones in the studio working on the album by clicking below. The tracklisting (original artists in brackets where appropriate) of 'Praise and Blame' is: 'What Good Am I' (Bob Dylan) 'Lord Help' (Jesse Mae Hemphill) 'Did Trouble Me' (Susan Werner) 'Strange Things' 'Burning Hell' (John Lee Hooker) 'If I Give My Soul' (Billy Joe Shaver) 'Don't Knock' 'Nobody's Fault But Mine' 'Didn't It Rain' 'Ain't No Grave' 'Run On' http://www.nme.com/news/tom-jones/51098

Voldar: 69- , , , . Indigo Arts Center . Man About Town: Bob Dylan marathon at Indigo Arts on Sunday In a few days, Bob Dylan will be 69 years old. Or should I tritely say 69 years young? Maybe forever young? Dylan has obviously been through all sorts of incarnations. My favorite version is the mid-1970s Dylan - albums like Blood on the Tracks and Desire. But no matter what Dylan you love - or not love - you're sure to find something worth hearing or seeing in a 6-hour marathon of rare and unreleased footage this Sunday from 5 to 11 p.m. at Indigo Arts Center at 703 D Louisville Rd. This one-of-a-kind show is the work of Jim Reed, who has been collecting rare filmed interviews and unreleased concert footage for 28 years. The former entertainment editor for Connect Savannah, the driving creative force behind Tiny Team Concerts, a drummer for bands including Superhorse and The Magic Rocks, and the founder of the ongoing Psychotronic Film Society, Reed has many passions. But among Reed's diverse interests, Dylan stands out. Sunday's show has been culled from literally hundreds of hours of video of the sometimes-prickly performer. The clips will not be presented chronologically, which should make for some fascinating - even disturbing - juxtapositions. Six hours is indeed a marathon, so attendees are welcome to arrive late or leave early - or to leave and come back. A printed program will be available at the door and online at www.myspace.com/psychotronicfilms. Indigo Arts, in the former Seaboard Freight Station just a moment down the hill from the Visitor Center on Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, has proven an excellent venue for all sorts of multimedia events. In just five months, founder JinHi Soucy Rand has made Indigo Arts a cultural hub that welcomes people of all backgrounds. In a few days, Bob Dylan will be 69 years old. Or should I tritely say 69 years young? Maybe forever young? Dylan has obviously been through all sorts of incarnations. My favorite version is the mid-1970s Dylan - albums like Blood on the Tracks and Desire. But no matter what Dylan you love - or not love - you're sure to find something worth hearing or seeing in a 6-hour marathon of rare and unreleased footage this Sunday from 5 to 11 p.m. at Indigo Arts Center at 703 D Louisville Rd. This one-of-a-kind show is the work of Jim Reed, who has been collecting rare filmed interviews and unreleased concert footage for 28 years. The former entertainment editor for Connect Savannah, the driving creative force behind Tiny Team Concerts, a drummer for bands including Superhorse and The Magic Rocks, and the founder of the ongoing Psychotronic Film Society, Reed has many passions. But among Reed's diverse interests, Dylan stands out. Sunday's show has been culled from literally hundreds of hours of video of the sometimes-prickly performer. The clips will not be presented chronologically, which should make for some fascinating - even disturbing - juxtapositions. Six hours is indeed a marathon, so attendees are welcome to arrive late or leave early - or to leave and come back. A printed program will be available at the door and online at www.myspace.com/psychotronicfilms. Indigo Arts, in the former Seaboard Freight Station just a moment down the hill from the Visitor Center on Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, has proven an excellent venue for all sorts of multimedia events. In just five months, founder JinHi Soucy Rand has made Indigo Arts a cultural hub that welcomes people of all backgrounds.

Voldar: . The Definitive Bob Dylan Songbook (Bob Dylan) * 790 Pages * Published by Music Sales America * Softcover The complete songbook from the greatest singer/songwriter of all time! Now with every song together in one giant volume, the ultimate Dylan songbook features over 329 tunes including all of his greatest hits as well as his lesser-known work. With melody line, chord symbols and full lyrics. Songs include Blowin in the Wind, Forever Young, Just Like a Woman, Mr. Tambourine Man, She Belongs to Me, Tangled Up in Blue, The Times They Are Changin , Visions of Johanna and hundreds more. http://www.amazon.com/Bob-Dylan-America-Sean-Wilentz/dp/0385529880%3FSubscriptionId%3DAKIAIE4IH63WQNI24PBA%26tag%3Ddaibrenew-20%26linkCode%3Dxm2%26camp%3D2025%26creative%3D165953%26creativeASIN%3D0385529880

Voldar: . Bob Dylan birthday tribute - Part one, with Jimi Hendrix Bob Dylan turns 69 years old on May 24. They say that imitation is the sincerest form of flattery. If that case, Dylan has been flattered plenty over the last half-century. Over the next week or so, I'll be posting cover versions of Bob Dylan songs from a variety of artists working in different genres. We'll start with Jimi Hendrix. His version of "All Along The Watchtower" is often considered not only the best Dylan cover, but possibly the greatest cover version of any song ever. This is Dylan's most performed live number. In 1974, when Dylan started doing the song in concert, it was based on Hendrix's arrangement. He has sung this song in concert over 1900 times, about 150 more than "Like A Rolling Stone". Atlanta Pop Festival, 1970 I liked Jimi Hendrix's record of this and ever since he died I've been doing it that way. Funny though, his way of doing it and my way of doing it weren't that dissimilar, I mean the meaning of the song doesn't change like when some artists do other artists' songs. Strange though how when I sing it I always feel like it's a tribute to him in some kind of way. He did a lot of my other songs too from that period... "Drifter's Escape", "Like a Rolling Stone", "Crawl Out Your Window", some others I don't remember. He would have done "Masters of War" exactly the way I do it now." Bob Dylan, "Biograph" liner notes, 1985. As Dylan mentioned, Hendrix covered other songs of his as well. Here's "Like A Rolling Stone" from his legendary 1967 performance at the Monterey Pop Festival: Here's a BBC recording from October 17, 1967, of "Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window?", broadcast November 13 on Alexis Korner's Rhythm and Blues program: Bob Dylan birthday tribute - Part two, 'Golden Throats' (Shatner, Cabot, Albert) cover Dylan This is part two in our series of Bob Dylan tributes, in honor of his upcoming 69th birthday on May 24. Not all Bob Dylan cover versions need to be serious. Below are some interesting interpretations of Dylan material, all from the 1960s. These say more about that decade than most people care to remember. William Shatner, "Mr. Tambourine Man" From 1988 to 1997, Rhino Records put out a series of records and CDs called Celebrity Throats, which featured Hollywood's finest actors and other celebrities covering the hits of the day. Some of the highlights included Cream's "White Room" by Cabaret's Joel Grey, "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction" by Phyllis Diller, and "Bridge Over Troubled Water" by Senator Sam J. Ervin, Jr. Sebastian Cabot, "It Ain't Me, Babe" Rhino released four volumes: Golden Throats: The Great Celebrity Sing Off , Golden Throats 2: More Celebrity Rock Oddities!, Golden Throats 3: Sweethearts of Rodeo Drive (all country music), and Golden Throats 4: Celebrities Butcher the Beatles. There was a proposed fifth disc of Dylan covers, but it never saw the light of day. However, there were Dylan songs included in the first three volumes, including "I'll Be Your Baby Tonight" by Laugh-In's Goldie Hawn, Green Acres' Eddie Albert tackling "Blowin' In The Wind", Star Trek's William Shatner's legendary take of "Mr. Tambourine Man", as well as three dramatic readings by Family Affair's Sebastian Cabot - "It Ain't Me, Babe", " All I Really Want To Do" and "Like A Rolling Stone". For good measure, there was also a version of The Animal's hit, "House Of The Rising Sun" by Andy Griffith. Eddie Albert, "Blowin' In The Wind" Let's have a bit of fun by enjoying these less revered, yet still entertaining, "interpretations". http://www.examiner.com/x-21829-Bob-Dylan-Examiner~y2010m5d18-Bob-Dylan-birthday-tribute--Part-two-Golden-Throats-Shatner-Cabot-Albert-cover-Dylan

Voldar: Happy birthday to you -