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Voldar: 1985 . Roy Orbison (from left), Jerry Lee Lewis, Carl Perkins, Johnny Cash and producer Chips Moman sing during the recording of Class Of 55 on Sept. 20, 1985. Moman recorded the reunion album at his old American Recording Studio on North Thomas using the four legendary rock 'n' rollers, each of whom got their start in Memphis. The face between Cash and Moman is lead guitar player Reggie Young. http://www.commercialappeal.com/photos/2010/sep/19/187631/

Voldar: Shades of Roy Orbison Dum-Dum-Dum-Dumby-Doo-Waaaaaah.... The unforgettable introductory lines of Roy Orbisons Only the Lonely first emanated from AM radios in the summer of 1960, along with other memorable sounds, such the clip-clop percussion of Fats Dominos Walking to New Orleans, and the lazy, drawling vocals of Alley Oop, a gimmick song by the Hollywood Argyles. And the plaintive, scion-of-scat-singing intro of Only the Lonely heralded one of many Orbison songs that would become classics, and it still holds up fifty years after it debuted. To say that Roy Orbisons work was memorable is an understatement, because nobodynobodyever sang like him. Orbison was gifted with what was arguably the most passionate voice in pop music history, and his admirers over the decades included Elvis Presley and U2s Paul Bono Hewson, among other famous vocalists. Orbisons songs were popular not only because of his heart-wrenching vocals, but also because many of his songs were types of mini-operas accompanied by a drum kit; i.e., dramatic and encaustic musical excursions for most listeners. There were gargantuan arrangements that included the use of strings, unexpected stop-and-start sections in the middle of songs, and abrupt endings that can best be described as hitting a sonic brick wall. And with all due respect to Johnny Cash, Orbison actually came off as a Man in Black onstage first, primarily because of those ubiquitous and seemingly-impenetrable black sunglasses, supplanted by a black outfit, black hair, and a black guitar. The Orbison repertoire wasnt all melodramatic, however. He could still have fun on songs like Mean Woman Blues and Ooby Dooby, often throwing in a trademark guttural inflection that was sort of a tomcat-like gargling growl. Tragedies in the life of the bespectacled singer had the potential put him out the public eye forever: His first wife was killed in a motorcycle accident, and his two oldest sons died in a fire, yet Orbison endured, even if he wasnt riding the top of the charts anymore. A major comeback began in the latter half of the Eighties, with a live album and concert video called A Black and White Night. Orbison was backed by Elvis Presleys band, and guests such as Bruce Springsteen performed...and yes, the show was filmed in black and white. There was also his participation in a, er, whimsical supergroup called the Traveling Wilburys. Other members included George Harrison, Bob Dylan, Tom Petty, and Jeff Lynne, and when Orbison took his vocal turn on the hit single Handle with Care, there wasnt any doubt who it was. He also recorded a new solo album called Mystery Girl. Then, all of a sudden he was gone, dead of a heart attack at the age of 52, on December 6, 1988. Mystery Girl, released posthumously, beget a smash single, You Got It, that was as classic as anything Orbison ever did, probably because it was exactly the same type of song that had propelled him to the top decades earlier. From its doubled-up snare drum licks in the bridge between the verse and chorus, lush arrangement,booming tympanis, and of course, soaring vocals, it would have easily been at home on the charts in the early Sixties. In August of this year, Orbisons last concert, recorded in Cincinnati just two days before his death, was released on CD. Its a magnificent-yet-simple tribute to Orbisons life and career. The performance is presented in a competent, straightforward-yet-loose manner (and no superstar guests), with that almighty voice ringing out clearly in front of eager listeners. The back cover photo on Roy Orbison: The Last Concert shows the singer waving to an audience, with a bemused-and-appreciative half-smile on his face. Theres no caption for that picture, but it speaks volumes about Roy Orbison and his musical legacy. http://www.thewetumpkaherald.com/opinion/article_5719a84a-d0d1-11df-8d1e-001cc4c002e0.html

Goldenday: ( ) 30 35 . , - 5'11 (1.75 ) Lifesize, standing 5'11" tall just like the Big O' himself. Roy Orbison free standing cardboard standup. Great for parties, and photo opportunities. Also available in a smaller version which stands 36" tall. *US Only

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Voldar: Roy Orbison in Worthing A HERALD photograph from 1967 has revealed the amazing story of musical great Roy Orbison and his connection with a back-street Worthing garage. The picture printed in 2006 shows the singer surrounded by admiring fans as he signs autographs in a previously unknown street. That road has now been identified as London Street, with locals past and present contacting us to tell their memories. Some were brought back to the scene of those memories for a new photograph, 40 years on. The tales they have told reveal Orbisons visit was far from a one-off. http://www.worthingherald.co.uk/community/nostalgia/roy_orbison_in_worthing_1_1571757

Voldar: - Soul Of Rock And Roll ROY KELTON ORBISON, JR. THE SOUL OF ROCK AND ROLL Into The 1950s The Big O. The New Teen Sensation. The Voice. The greatest singer in the world. Lefty Wilbury. The Soul of Rock and Roll. There is only one Roy Orbison. And there are many. Blue-haired Rockabillys, Japanese leather rockers, All-American college girls whose favorite movie is Pretty Woman, Elvis-lovers, country music fans, 15-year-old Goths who paint their fingernails black, Pavarotti and classical music buffs, Ramones punk rockers, Johnny Cash disciples, and good old-fashioned Roy Orbison diehards who have stood by him from the beginning. They all see a different Roy Orbison. They all see their own Roy Orbison. Roy Orbison stands alone on a lofty branch in the Family tree of Rock and Roll. Yet in the history of recorded music, he was closer to the roots. By the time he cut his first single, Ooby Dooby (Sun 242), in May of 1956 at Sam Phillips Mecca of Rock and Roll, Sun Studios, Orbison was already a veteran musician. With his own radio show for 10 years, and a television show in Texas with his band, The Teen Kings, his audience was over 10,000 people by the time he was 17. His musical world was equal parts country and blues, with a few extra elements added in. The regional Mexican music that seeped in on the airwaves left an indelible stain on him very early in life (the Mexican music, itself a mixture of Spanish and American-Indian music, had dramatic rhythms and smoothly sung melodies). Another necessary ingredient was the profound effect of American cinema. John Wayne actually had a generation of kids like Elvis, Buddy Holly, and Roy Orbison believing they could do anything they set their minds to. And do they did. Roy carved the path for Buddy Holly to go to Norman Pettys studios in Clovis, New Mexico, and Buddy cleared the way for the world to be proud to wear glasses. The story of Roy Orbison could not be told without Buddy Holly. Roy was from Wink, Buddy was from Lubbock. They played the same local venues and shopped at the same guitar shops. At times they were friends eating peanut butter and jelly sandwiches and trading guitar riffs as teenagers. At times cross-town rivals cursing outside each others shows. Buddy would cover many of Roys songs, including A True Love Goodbye and An Empty Cup. Orbisons time at Sun started the same sort of leap-frogging and interaction with Elvis, Carl Perkins and Warren Smith. Roy was the next Rock and Roller at Sun Records. Coming later would be Jerry Lee Lewis, Billy Riley and Charlie Rich, along with every other 50s Rock and Roller outside Sun who would soon copy the Sun Records style (and all those that came after). Jerry Lee Lewis first walked through Sam Phillips doors during the Roy Orbison session for the song Rockhouse. Soon Jerry Lee cut Orbisons song Go! Go! Go! The actual name Roy used for the song was Down The Line. Sam Phillips renamed it Go! Go! Go! to add excitement (Sam did the same thing with Perkins Gone! Gone! Gone! and Cashs Cry! Cry! Cry!). Orbison also befriended the musical director Bill Justis and engineer/producer/songwriter Jack Clement, who would work with Roy in the future. Sam Phillips heard the world different from other people. He wanted fast music with a beat. And he got it. The sound was crisp, defiant, and perfectly clear. It still is. In Ooby Dooby, Roy unleashes two in-your-face guitar solos in two minutes at speeds not played before at Sun. Domino is so raw that you can feel it about to break at any second. Roys band, The Teen Kings, was already popular from their high school days. They were: Roy Orbison on guitar and vocals, Billy Pat Ellis on drums, Johnny Peanuts Wilson on rhythm guitar, James Morrow on electric mandolin and Jack Kennelly on bass. The music they made was remarkably good. Bands like this are special, because they are friends to start with. They made great cuts like Rockhouse and Youre My Baby roll and rock. Then like all friends, they got in an argument, but this one was in Sun Records studio, and whoever owned the car took off with the band and left Roy high and dry in Memphis. Sam Phillips and Jack Clement took Roy next door to the café to calm him down. It hurt Roy a lot to lose his friends and his band and have to move on without them. He lived at Mr. Phillips house for several weeks at a time, working with the regular Sun musicians -- Roland Janes on guitar, Stan Kesler on bass and J.M. Van Eaton on drums. Warren Smith was Roys good friend. Smith did Orbisons song So Long Im Gone, and Orbison used Smiths band on some of the Sun Records package tours put on by Bob Neals Stars Incorporated. Between tour dates, Roy stayed at Carl Perkins house. On a few occasions when Roy opened the show, he caused riots, and the show would be canceled before anyone else had the chance to play. They were banned from several towns, and things did get out of hand regularly. Any stories you could hear wouldnt measure up to the reality of what happened: Roy and Jerry Lee and Jack Clement buying three motorcycles on a whim one day. No licenses, no helmets. Elvis and Roy exiting a radio station and finding themselves in the middle of a fistfight between Johnny and Dorsey Burnette of The Rock and Roll Trio. Carl and Roy running down the street with girls ripping their clothes off. Johnny Cash was there for every bump in the road of Roys life. Roy loved Johnny. Johnny loved Roy. Their friendship would fill many books. Most of their stories, they took with them. Orbison was the first to do a Johnny Cash song, Youre My Baby. On the road at Sun, Roy and Johnny would be in one car, and Jerry Lee and Carl in another. Inside jokes, pranks, promises and bets with no moneyIf Heaven has a backstage, Roy and Johnny are probably still at it. Claudette Frady was Roys teenage sweetheart. He wrote the song Claudette for her. The Everly Brothers, Roys dear friends, covered the song in 1958. They released it as the B-side to the Boudleaux Bryant song All I Have To Do Is Dream. That put Claudette on every jukebox in America. In a way, its Orbisons first big hit, except that Ooby Dooby was number one everywhere Roy went in 1956. Roy was a dreamer, and Claudette was the girl of his dreams. The kind of beauty to compete with the images he saw on the silver screen. In the desert of Texas, the cinema was the only window of opportunity to see that there was anything beyond the horizon. Women like Lana Turner didnt exist in West Texas. But by all accounts, Claudette was special and more beautiful. In his high school yearbook, Roy wrote: To lead a Western band is his after school wish, and of course to marry a beautiful dish. In September 1957, Roy and Claudette were married. Both of his wishes had already come true. The 1956 Guitar Pull Medley is an interesting rarity that has Orbison playing Top 40 hits of the day, many of them by Elvis Presley. These are among the earliest cover versions of what would become the most classic of all Rock and Roll songs. Its lucky for us there was a mobile recorder in West Texas that night. Hail! Hail! Rock and Roll! As they left Sun Records, Johnny Cash went to Columbia and Roy followed Elvis to RCA Victor. There, he worked with Chet Atkins, Floyd Cramer and Boots Randolph. If you could go back to any particular place in time in music history, Nashvilles legendary Studio B with Mr. Guitar, Mr. Piano and Mr. Saxophone would be high on the list. Roy cherished working with Chet Atkins in particular as a personal highlight of his career. RCA Victor proved to be a transitional period for Orbison. The calm between the storms produced the song With The Bug. In Pretty One, you can hear the swagger of Sun in the vocals giving way to the more sophisticated arrangements and singing style that Roy preferred. Its as though each song Roy ever recorded shows him learning to harness and control the tremendous power of his voice. The Voice. At this time he still took off his glasses onstage and for publicity pictures, but this would happen less and less. Buddy Holly had softened the stigma of glasses for America. Soon Orbison delivered the knockout punch, elevating sunglasses to super-cool status and bringing them mainstream. He just took his simple-poorboy-drugstore glasses and had a pair custom-made with dark lenses. Genius. Today even New York supermodels are wearing them as fashion statements. INTO THE 1960s TO EXPERIENCE Roy Orbison on the radio during the years 1960-1965 at Monument must have been a thrilling ride as Roy outdid himself again and again. Each time making the song bigger or louder, the notes higher and longer, the arrangements more complex and more natural. These were the days of singles; you got a B-side, but the A-side was all that mattered. It was a high-wire act. With Roy as the lyricist and songwriter, singing and playing the songs, they hit like a complete package. And hit they did. In this period, Roy Orbison was undeniable. Biggest record sales. Biggest audiences. Biggest tours. Manhandling the charts worldwide. Orbison was the only American to chart regularly during the British invasion. Only The Lonely hit #2 on the American charts and #1 on the U.K. charts. Roy was strengthened by the amazing talent he had surrounded himself with. There was Fred Foster, president of Monument Records. Fred Foster believed in Roys talent. There were Boudleaux and Felice Bryant, the wonderful husband-and-wife songwriting team, who took Roy under their wing. The best musicians in Nashville added to the extremely high level of quality: Harold Bradley, Hank Garland, Jerry Kennedy, Floyd Cramer, Boots Randolph, Charlie McCoy (Mr. Harmonica), Bob Moore and Buddy Harman Jr. Roys publisher and manager was Wesley Rose of Acuff-Rose. Roy and Wesley Rose shared a similar relationship to Fred Pappy Rose and Hank Williams. Joe Melson, Roys new songwriting partner, was already a great songwriter. The combination produced unique, extraordinary songs, great care going into them, like chiseling a statue out of stone. Songs like Only The Lonely, Blue Angel, Running Scared, Crying, Blue Bayou and The Crowd speak for themselves better than any attempt to explain them. By In Dreams, all the classic Orbison elements are in place. When he could, he preferred recording his own songs. He got a better feeling of them that way. In Dreams is, in a way, the most Orbison song. He wrote it fading into sleep, and upon waking, he had it done and ready to go. He just had to pick up a guitar to check the chords he dreamt. In Dreams was written while he was asleep. Thats about as magic as it gets in real life. Magic is transferred to the tape on many Orbison songs. Crying is rolling along, Roy says then you stopped, and the music stops completely for a beat. In the song Falling, when Roy sings the word falling, his voice drops from a high note to a low one. In I Drove All Night, Roys voice mimics a car engine shifting through the gears and fading into the distance. Can things like this be planned? Can you ever really harness fire? Scattered among the selections on Disc Two are the songs considered to be Roy Orbisons greatest hits, but Roys B-sides were often better than other peoples A-sides. Case in point, a song called Love Hurts, which was buried on the B-side of Running Scared. Most people never turned the record over. Running Scared was that good. Pretty Paper is Roys Christmas song. Roy was one of the first people to do a Willie Nelson song (Willie still had short hair, so that tells you how far back it was). INTO THE 1970s MEAN Woman Blues is a standard of Rock and Roll. Roys new lyrics and re-working turned it into a Roy Orbison original. (In his live shows, Carl Perkins always included a hidden tribute to Roy by doing Orbisons version.) Was Orbison using rockers to set up his ballads, or ballads to set up his rockers? Does it matter when youve got songs like Whatd I Say from a concert in Holland in 1965, Roy at peak form and belting out Ray Charles classic with his road band, The Candymen? Its Over was recorded March 10, 1964, and was Roys secret weapon. Whatever your favorite Roy Orbison song, Its Over will make you think twice. The chords, the dynamics, the drama, the naturalness could only be Roy Orbison. Unlike most of his other songs, this one isnt covered too often. He stood alone on stage, and barely moved, yet could bring people in his audience to tears. Even band members frequently missed parts because they choked up. Through his life, this tremendous talent he had for ballads eclipsed all other elements of his persona. The black clothes, upturned collar and dark sunglasses, the inventive songwriting, the tragedy in his life, his vocal talent, and the lyrics all became an extension of the sadness of the ballads. With Elvis, wearing all black was sexy. With Johnny Cash, wearing all black was cool. Orbison blackness is a bit colder, more blue-black, more lonely. In the summer of 1964, Roy was playing a 12-string acoustic Epiphone guitar. He always wrote on acoustic guitars. He and co-writer Bill Dees were piecing together a song that needed a riff; the riff that Roy hit straight off was to become one of rock musics greatest treasures. Orbison made special arrangements for this song. He knew he wanted pounding drums to kick it off, so he brought a second drummer to the session so the drums would be twice as loud. He also wanted to shake up his usual recording team and brought a handful of guitarists. Billy Sanford and Jerry Kennedy were the two session aces Roy chose for the special session. The song, Oh, Pretty Woman, reached number one globally. Guitarists have been playing it ever since. Eddie Van Halen took the song to number 12 in 1982. Oh, Pretty Woman has a wonderful quality; while youre actually listening to it, it is the greatest song you have ever heard. From Julia Roberts in the film Pretty Woman to Jim Carrey in Dumb and Dumber, the song is in all your favorite movies too. It has been to the United States Supreme Court and back. Now, its on ringtones, YouTube, SingStar and Guitar Hero. If you really have to get your Pretty Woman fix, its on MySpace and Facebook 24 hours a day. Little kids are rocking out to it right now. Like Roy himself, Oh, Pretty Woman changes into something new every few years. Roys opening acts while touring in Australia every year form a little musical history of its own. Each band immediately borrowing certain elements of what they saw Roy do live: With the Beach Boys in 1964. With The Rolling Stones in 1965. With the Yardbirds in 1967, spending time with Peter Grant, future manager of Led Zeppelin, and Jimmy Page. Ride Away highlights Roys love for motorcycles. Roy was an avid motorcycle and automobile collector (at one time, he had so many cars he bought the local drive-in theater to store them all). Early on, Elvis showed Roy his new Harley-Davidson. Roy had to have one. Later phone calls between the two usually included congratulating each other and talking about customizing Harleys. However, motorcycles would become a symbol of tragedy in Roy Orbisons private life. On June 6, 1966, Claudette Orbison died in Roys arms after being struck by a truck while they were motorcycling in Tennessee. The second of Roys three sons with Claudette, Anthony King Orbison, asked him if Mama rode to Heaven on a Harley? and Roy replied, Yes, Mama rode to Heaven on a Harley. Crawling Back sneaks up on you. After youve heard it a few times, it changes from a song of beauty and grabs you by the throat. The vulnerability develops to an almost unbearable level. Orbison could give you so many different pictures and shades of sadness. Further tragedy struck when a fire destroyed his home on the lake in Tennessee, killing two of his three children. Roy Dwayne Orbison, who loved karate, was 10 years old and Anthony was 6. Anthonys favorite television show was Get Smart. Roy sold the land to Johnny Cash, whose house burned on the same spot in 2007. One of Roys favorite houses in Malibu also would burn in 1993 with much of Roys belongings. So to say fire was a curse and a monster is not far from the truth. Walk On shows what Bob Dylan meant with the words: Roy sang like a professional criminal. Orbison was a pro, and his intensity does feel like life or death. He seemed to know some things that cant be taught. Studio footage of him singing Walk On shows his hand tightening into a fist on heavy notes. His facial expressions projecting a now or never attitude. He took his music deadly seriously. Orbison was so popular that in addition to the first $1 million contract ever, MGM offered him a movie deal. The movie is called The Fastest Guitar Alive and contains great video footage of Roy performing several songs. One of the best is Pistolero. He fell in love with Southern California while filming the movie. Roy believed God, music, time and love could cure all things. Something had happened to give Roy the hope of love. Just when he needed it most, he met the girl who would become his wife and constant companion. Roy married Barbara Annemarie Wellhoener Jakobs on May 24, 1969. When Roy would say Barbara saved my life in interviews, everyone knew he meant it literally. In Barbara, he had found what he was looking for, the once in a lifetime soulmate love that only happens in dreams. In his live shows, Orbison always had a few extra rockers to add to his ballad heavy string of hits. Land Of 1000 Dances from a 1972 show in Australia is a good example, recorded with his backing band of the time, The Art Movement. In the 1970s, Roy poured his energy into his family. With his parents, surviving son Wesley K. Orbison, and two new sons, Roy Jr and Alex Orbi Orbison, Roy and Barbara found fun in life again. Even during his Lost Years, Orbison was still quite active. Winning a Grammy Award for his duet with Emmylou Harris, That Lovin You Feelin Again. Touring with the Eagles in 1978. Doing benefits like Farm Aid, and appearing on The Dukes Of Hazzard with Daisy Duke. INTO THE 1980s JERRY Lee Lewis, Carl Perkins, Johnny Cash and Roy Orbison got together one last time. The album was called Homecoming, and what a glorious reunion it was. Carl Perkins gave the best vocal performances of his career. Johnny wrote his best lyrics. Jerry Lee was still wild, and Roy Orbison was still emotional. The songs somehow sound better today than the day they were released in 1985. Roys solo song, Coming Home, contains a spiritual quality. A picture was taken at Sun of Carl, Johnny, Jerry Lee and Elvis and dubbed The Million-Dollar Quartet. It would have been The Million-Dollar Quintet, except that Roy was in Texas at the time. The name, The Million-Dollar Quartet, was considered for the reunion band, but out of respect for Elvis, they called themselves Class of 55. Along with the death of Elvis Presley, Class of 55 was the end of the beginning of Rock and Roll. The songs conjure up these friends as a Big Train from Memphis, with Elvis as the engine in the front, Carl the next boxcar, Johnny the next, Roy the next, all the other cool cats from Sun next, and Jerry Lee as the caboose to tear the whole thing down. The passage of time shows just how special that train would prove to be. In the movie Blue Velvet, director David Lynch pointed out the darkness inherent in any Roy Orbison song. In this case, the beautiful song In Dreams would be re-imagined as a nightmare. Lynch also made a Spanish version of Crying called Llorando the set piece for his movie Mulholland Drive. There never was a band that had more fun than the Traveling Wilburys. Like a musical version of Monty Python, Nelson Wilbury, Otis Wilbury, Lefty Wilbury, Lucky Wilbury and Charley T. Junior humbly made music history, notably by actually making great music. George Harrison had befriended Roy when The Beatles were the supporting act for the English leg of Orbisons 1963 world tour. That friendship came back full-circle when Tom Petty (who was working with Orbison on various projectsThe Heartbreakers are all over the album Mystery Girl), Jeff Lynne of the Electric Light Orchestra (Roys trusted friend and producer) and Bob Dylan (the best lyricist ever, among other things) formed the dream band. George Harrison was only in two bands for all he achieved in his mighty career. George is still a Beatle, and he is still a Wilbury. Thy Wilbury Done. Roys spotlight song on the Traveling Wilburys album, Not Alone Any More, is one of his best vocals. It soars like an Angel. You Got It is so catchy, its almost not fair to the listener. Its like one big chorus. You can hear how big Roys love was by the conviction in his voice. The words of a man who promises the world and can deliver. Its the true life serenade of Roy to Barbara Orbison. When Roy and Bono of U2 worked together, Bono turned out a gem of a song. Shes A Mystery To Me has a wonderful rhythm and many classic Orbison elements. It sounds like it could be from Orbisons classic Monument period, yet is as modern as what it isa U2 song with Roy Orbison singing. Roys life in the 1980s on the beaches of California was his golden period. From his Pacific Ocean front porch, he could see the beauty of the sunset or hear the thunder over Kanan Dume. He always said the sky there has a special blue color. When he was on the road, a certain time of day always made him miss Barbara. He would look up at the sky and wish he was seeing the cloudless blue sky of California. Like a latter day Blue Bayou, Roy captured the emotion of longing again with California Blue. Roy Orbison and Friends: A Black and White Night was captured on audio and black-and-white video. No color footage exists. The sounds are vivid enough without it. Great Rock and Roll guitarist James Burton throws cascades of colorful notes across every song. Alex Acuña and the rest of Elvis TCB Band playing with Roy gives the show a Holy Elvis quality. Bruce Springsteen, Tom Waits, Jackson Browne, Elvis Costello, Bonnie Raitt, k.d. lang and T Bone Burnett turned in heartfelt renditions with a unique chemistry. (Orbison worked frequently with super-talented T Bone Burnett, who was also the musical director for Black and White Night.) On top of all of this was Roy himself, giving the performance of a lifetime. New songs like (All I Can Do Is) Dream You burn with the fire of a young man alongside classics like Oh, Pretty Woman. Bruce Springsteen helped Roy many times, in many ways. In his early days, Bruce had opened the show for Orbison and would later write Roy Orbison singing for the lonely in his song Thunder Road. It was Bruce Springsteen who inducted Roy into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1987 with a riveting speech. Roy loved The Bosss live shows and received a surprise when Bruce sang Happy Birthday to him from the stage in Los Angeles. Springsteens integrity was well known to Roy, and it was an association and friendship that made Roy very proud. Thank you Bruce! Right til the end, Roy always liked upbeat Rock and Roll. Heartbreak Radio could be a song from his Sun days recorded in the year 2050. Its the same old boogie-woogie in disguise. Jeff Lynnes talents graced I Drove All Night. His deep understanding of music allowed him to match Roys voice in ways no one else was ever able. Roy could sing flawlessly over anything Jeff played, and Jeff could play perfectly behind anything Roy sang. They worked well together, and Jeff added yet another chapter of genius to Roys life. Roys last great long-term songwriting collaboration was with fellow Texan Will Jennings. With Will, Roy created his most mature works. The point of view in these songs isnt oldits ancient. Wild Hearts Run Out Of Time was written for a movie about Marilyn Monroe, but the song is so personal, with Roy singing lines about being in the dying of the light and in the sunshine of your mind, that in retrospect it seems autobiographical. It would be a heart attack that claimed him too early in life. Life Fades Away is a spooky song. In the opening lyrics, Roy sings, My time has come, the clouds are calling / December Wind has come my way. Produced by Rick Rubin, the song begs the question of what great songs the relationship might have yielded. With Orbison, Rubin began a new direction in his series of successes. Rick put the song on the soundtrack for the movie Less Than Zero. Seeing Roy and Slayer on the same album is the type of cool factor Rick is so good at. Working with Roy led Rick to Johnny Cash. Roy Orbison was buried December 1988, in the most famous cemetery in the world. His pallbearers were the Traveling Wilburys. The sky was raining. BUT HEROES DONT DIE. Roy Orbison stood alone at 511 inches and cast a long shadow over Rock and Roll. He never lost a childlike fascination with music and a humility that he was given admiration and money for what he would have done anyway for free. Music was what it was all about. The guitar was his best friend, and together they had a lot of fun. MERCY !!!! ROY KELTON ORBISON, JR 2008 http://www.royorbison.com/us/node/61

Voldar: , , . My Hero Roy Orbison Roy Orbison! What a beacon in the southernmost gloom. The amazing Roy Orbison. He was one of those Texan guys who could sail through anything, including his whole tragic life. His kids die in a fire, his wife dies in a car crash, nothing in his private life went right for the big O, but I cant think of a gentler gentleman, or a more stoic personality. That incredible talent for blowing himself up from 5ft 6in to 6ft 9in, which he seemed to be able to do on stage. It was amazing to witness. Hes been in the sun, looking like a lobster, pair of shorts on. And were just sitting around playing guitars, having a chat, smoke and a drink. Well, Im on in five minutes. We watch the opening number. And out walks this totally transformed thing that seems to have grown at least a foot with presence and command over the crowd. He was in his shorts just now; how did he do that? Its one of those astounding things about working in the theatre. Backstage you can be a bunch of bums. And Ladies and gentlemen or I present to you, and youre somebody else. Keith Richards 2010. Extracted from Life by Keith Richards with James Fox, published by Weidenfeld & Nicolson. http://www.royorbison.com/us/news/roy-orbison-featured-life-keith-richards

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Voldar: Ballet Memphis Presents "In Dreams," Featured In New York Times he dancers of Ballet Memphis have recently been performing Trey McIntyre's ballet "In Dreams," set to the songs of Roy Orbison! The ballet was presented over the summer as part of the Kennedy Center Opera House's "Ballet Across America" special event series as featured in the New York Times! In Dreams is set to Roy Orbison songs. Since Orbison recorded his first album in Memphis, he is part of the musical tradition that Ms. Pugh hopes to tap for her company. Calling him the Plácido Domingo of country music, she likened his singing to the sound of the human heart breaking. Part of the interest of Mr. McIntyres work is that it catches fragments of that heartbreak while never trying to illustrate the songs words literally. The lyrics say one thing, the dance says another, but they stay in close connection both in mood and in details of phrasing. And so he negotiates the difficulty of choreographing to music so generally appealing that it might easily overwhelm most dances. Though In Dreams makes its dancers look good, its not concerned with technical skill. It starts with, and often returns to, a striking formation whereby its five dancers travel, softly and close together, around the stage: this has a dreamlike quality. Then the way one or more dancers separate themselves from the group makes them seem characters in (or dreamers of) the dream. Even when theyre looking out front, they appear to be sightless. A passage of footwork may suddenly tie in to a figure in the musical accompaniment, a sudden lift may catch a salient note in Orbisons singing, a dancer may arch back on a closing chord, but much of the choreography floats around the music. In solos, duets and trios, different images of need emerge; but even though the duets are intense, its as if theyre happening in the traumatized unconscious. In Dreams which I imagine would make more impact in a smaller theater is distinctive, touching, and ambiguous. http://www.nytimes.com/2010/06/19/arts/dance/19america.html?_r=1

Voldar: ... Twenty-two years ago, December 6, 1988, rock and roll legend Roy Orbison passed away from a heart attack outside of Nashville. Orbison was then at the height of his career with two albums in Billboards Top 5, Mystery Girl and The Travelling Wilburys. He left behind one of historys greatest musical legacies. Since his untimely passing, not a day goes by without a glimpse of Roy Orbisons lasting influence, from his iconic sunglasses to his romantic, unforgettable voice singing some of rock and rolls most famous songs. The lyrics he wrote echo what millions have felt. What would the world be like without Oh, Pretty Woman, Only the Lonely, Crying, In Dreams, Blue Bayou, and You Got It? Please join us at RoyOrbison.com to celebrate the life of this great singer, songwriter, musician, husband, father, and friend. Please leave your favorite Roy Orbison memory, story, or photo in our special "December 6th Roy Memories" forum or on the Roy Facebook Wall. The 10 best fan submissions will be chosen and displayed on the front page of RoyOrbison.com. Winning fans will also receive exclusive items from the Roy Orbison Store. Sony Legacy and Roy Orbison Enterprises are also gearing up a special campaign to celebrate Roy Orbisons 75th Birthday early next spring. Please keep an eye out for news and updates. We miss you Roy! Take a moment and listen to Roy's final performance of "Oh, Pretty Woman" from The Last Concert on December 4, 1988 in Heighland Heights, OH: http://www.royorbison.com/us/news/remembrance-legendary-roy-orbison

Voldar: , , Oh, Pretty woman. , ..., . - . Oh, Pretty woman - 1 http://www.silver.ru/air/programmes/second-hand/issues/11466/ Oh, Pretty woman - 2 http://www.silver.ru/air/programmes/second-hand/issues/11656/

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Voldar: . . Merry Christmas and Happy New Year from all of us at Roy Orbison Enterprises and RoyOrbison.com! Class of 55 from the 1977 Johnny Cash Christmas Special. Roy's Holiday Classic, Pretty Paper! http://www.royorbison.com/us/news/roy-world

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Voldar: ... Burka Woman Saad Haroon From Pakistani news magazine, NewsLine: Its a goofy parody, but good enough for a few laughs even a couple of out-loud ones. In fact, Saad Haroons music video send-up of the classic Roy Orbison tune Oh, Pretty Woman is a fitting way to close out the troubling year Pakistan has now almost completed. As our society gets further radicalised and divided, we need all the laughs we can get. There is a subtle message of hope to be had too. Perhaps there is hope in the power of technology that has found traction in Pakistan? In the video, Saad Haroons purdah-ed romance seems to have been saved by high-tech wizardry. This year, many Pakistanis, too, have done a fine job of adopting technology to combat never-ending crises and support progressive initiatives. So dont lose hope, sweetu. http://mideastposts.com/2010/12/20/burka-woman-saad-haroon/

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